Dan Marshall - Home is Burning - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • E-Book £P.O.R.
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    • ISBN:9781473624320
    • Publication date:22 Oct 2015
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    • ISBN:9781473626188
    • Publication date:22 Oct 2015

Home is Burning

By Dan Marshall

  • Hardback
  • £16.99

Hilarious, heart-wrenching and brilliantly written account of a twenty something returning home to his large, eccentric, foul mouthed family to care for his beloved, dying father.

'An incredibly personal story...sad, but unbelievably funny' - Claudia Winkleman, BBC Radio 2 Arts Show

'This memoir is gasp-out-loud, offensively funny, touching and a sure thing for anyone who likes David Sedaris - but with more Mormons' - Red


At twenty-five, Dan left his 'spoiled white asshole' life in Los Angeles to look after his dying parents in Salt Lake City, Utah. His mother, who had already been battling cancer on and off for close to 15 years, had taken a turn for the worse. His father, a devoted marathon runner and adored parent, had been diagnosed with motor neurone disease which was quickly eroding his body. Dan's four siblings were already home, caring for their parents and resenting Dan for not doing the same.

Home is Burning tells the story of Dan's year at home in Salt Lake City, as he reunites with his eclectic family -the only non-Mormon family of seven in the entire town- all of them trying their best to be there for the father who had always been there for them.

Biographical Notes

DAN MARSHALL grew up in a nice home with nice parents in Salt Lake City, Utah, before attending UC Berkeley. After college, Dan worked at a strategic communications public relations firm in Los Angeles. At 25 he left work and returned to Salt Lake to take care of his sick parents. While caring for them, he started writing detailed accounts about many of their weird, sad, funny adventures. Home Is Burning is his first book.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473624290
  • Publication date: 22 Oct 2015
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
It's hard to imagine how a memoir about moving home to take care of your cancer-stricken mom and your dying dad could be fun to read, but Dan Marshall manages to pull it off. Equal parts hilarious and heart-breaking, Home is Burning proves that with family, tragedy always has company. — James Frey
Intensely moving and very funny. The strength of this account is in the sardonic observations of family life and the unsentimental glue that binds the unit as the protagonists try to come to terms with a death they all know is imminent. Home is Burning is a deft piece of writing that captures the vicissitudes of family life whether in sickness or in health. — The Times
Both a touching memoir about the author losing both his parents, and the funniest fucking thing I've ever read-profane, self-aware, and ruthlessly honest. Dan Marshall might be a self-described 'spoiled white asshole,' but he's also a depraved comedic genius. — Justin St. Germain
A death in the family-the whole miserable and hilarious story, complete with all the gory mechanical details of grief, rage, drug binges, hostility, self-pity and more rage. — Rob Sheffield
Horrible. Hysterical. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Just like life. — Jenny Lawson
This memoir is gasp-out-loud, offensively funny, touching and a sure thing for anyone who likes David Sedaris - but with more Mormons. — Red
The literary love child of Dave Eggers and David Sedaris. — Publishers Weekly
It's crude, obscene, haunting and very good — Spectator

Agnes Light

Agnes Light has been a midwife for over 30 years. She lives in London and this is her first book.

Bernard Hare

Bernard Hare was born in 1958 into a Leeds mining family. He was educated at grammar school and after gaining a BA in Applied Social Sciences at Hatfield Polytechnic, he became a social worker. Dillusioned with the system following the miners' strike of 1984, he dropped out, working occasionally as a removal man. He now writes, plays chess, and works in community arts - he has edited Reflections, a collection of pieces by the creative writing class at East Leeds Family Learning Centre, and Flatlands, an anthology of writing and a CD of music by local people, organised by the Flatlands Community Arts Group which Bernard co-founded.

Bill Oddie

Bill Oddie is the ultimate 'jack of all trades', known as a comedy writer, pop singer, musician, TV presenter, naturalist, depressive, environmental campaigner, husband of two, father of three and author, with his 2009 autobiography One Flew Into the Cuckoo's Egg. Aged 67, hee was made an OBE in 2003.

Bill Paterson

Bill Paterson was born in Glasgow. His theatre career includes being a founder member of 7:84 Theatre Company with the landmark production of The Cheviot, The Stag and the Black, Black Oil. Film and Television work includes Wives and Daughters, The Crow Road, The Witches, Truly Madly Deeply, Traffik, The Singing Detective, Aufweidersehn Pet, Comfort and Joy and The Killing Fields. He is a Fellow of the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.

Brenda Ashford

Brenda is 91 years old and lives near Milton Keynes. She worked as a Norland Nanny for over sixty years and loved every minute of it.

Cherry Denman

Almost educated at St Teresa's Convent, Effingham, Cherry Denman went on to study at the Ruskin School of Drawing, Oxford and at the Royal College of Art. An acclaimed artist and illustrator, she has written and illustrated several previous books including A Modern Book of Hours and The History Puzzle. Cherry is married with two children and, when not abroad, lives in London, where she tries to ignore the glazed looks of her loyal friends as she recounts her tales of typhoons and tarantulas, and pretends not to care when they assume her West African voodoo fetish earrings come from Accessorize. And how was she supposed to know that samphire was the new broccoli?

Christina Noble

Christina Noble was born in the slums of Dublin city. At the age of ten her mother died, and her alcoholic father could no longer care for her or her siblings. In the years that followed she suffered physical, emotional and sexual abuse in orphanages and on the streets, and after her marriage she was the victim of domestic violence. One night she had a dream about the street children of Vietnam and decided to make it reality. In 1989 she set up the Christina Noble Children's Foundation in Ho Chi Minh city and in 1997 she expanded it to Mongolia. To this day she continues to devote her life to improving the lives of the street children.

Clarissa Dickson Wright

Clarissa Dickson Wright found fame alongside Jennifer Paterson as one half of the much-loved TV cooking partnership Two Fat Ladies. She is the author of the bestselling memoir Spilling the Beans as well as many cookery books including The Game Cookbook and, most recently, Potty - her one-pot cookbook. She is also a passionate supporter of the Countryside Alliance and of rural life. She lives a little in London but mostly in Scotland.

Constance Briscoe

Constance Briscoe practises as a barrister and in 1996 became a part-time judge - one of the first black women to sit as a judge in the UK. She lives in Clapham with her two children, Martin and Francesca. Her partner is Tony Arlidge QC.

Denis Avey

Denis Avey was born in Essex in 1919. He fought in the desert during the Second World War and was captured and held as a Prisoner of War in a camp near Auschwitz III. In 2010 he received a British Hero of the Holocaust award. Denis lives in Derbyshire.

Dickie Bird

Born in 1933, the son of a miner, Dickie Bird has spent a life 'married to cricket'. He was signed up to play for Yorkshire age 19, and played on the county circuit for the next 13 years. In 1979 he became a Test match umpire. The announcement that he would umpire his final Test at Lord's in June 1996 signalled the end of an international career which has won him worldwide affection as the finest umpire in cricket history.

Emma Pearse

Emma Pearse is an Australian journalist who lived in New York for over ten years, where she wrote for New York, Slate, Salon and Village Voice, among others. Emma now lives and works between Australia and New York. Sophie is her first book.

Franny Moyle

Franny Moyle has a degree in English and History of Art from St John's College, Cambridge. She enjoyed a career in arts programming at the BBC that culminated in her becoming the corporation's first Commissioner for Arts and Culture. She is now a freelance executive producer and writer as well as a director of the Hackney Empire, which is near her home in East London. She is married and has three children.

Garrison Keillor

Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, Minnesota, and graduated from Minnesota University in 1966, already writing for the New Yorker. He hosted the live radio show 'A Prairie Home Companion', delivering a weekly monologue set in the quiet, fictional mid-western town of Lake Wobegon. He has been described as 'the best humorous writer to come out of America since Thurber.'

Gary Mulgrew

Gary Mulgrew was born in Glasgow in 1962 and lived there until he graduated from the University of Strathclyde. He joined NatWest Bank in 1983 and worked for them in Manchester, London, Tokyo and New York before joining the Royal Bank of Canada in 2000. His banking career ended in June 2002 when he was indicted by the US authorities for allegedly defrauding NatWest. After years of court battles and a high profile public campaign, he and two other members of the 'NatWest Three' were eventually extradited to America. Two years of detention in Houston, Texas were followed by two years in seven different prisons in the United States and England until his full release in early 2010. He now runs a number of successful businesses in the south of England, supported by his bankers, NatWest.

Halima Bashir

Halima Bashir grew up in the remote deserts of Darfur, Sudan, in a loving family that was part of the black African Zaghawa tribe. She proved herself to be academically gifted and went on to be the first person in her village to qualify as a medical doctor. But then war broke out and her life sprialled into an unimaginably dark nightmare. In 2005 she finally sought asylum in the UK where she continues to speak out about the violence in Sudan. In October 2008 she won the Victor Gollancz Human Rights Prize. Halima still lives in the UK with her husband and two sons and they were all granted UK citizenship in 2008.

Henry Hemming

Henry Hemming lives in London, UK.

Horatio Clare

Horatio Clare has worked on Front Row and Nightwaves, and produced Radio 3`s The Verb. Born in 1973, Clare has written for The Spectator, the New Statesman, the Guardian, and the Daily Telegraph.

Jacqueline Walker

Jacqueline Walker arrived in Britain in 1959. She has been a teacher and a mother of three, and taught creative writing as well completed two Arvon writing courses. Pilgrim State is her first book.

Jai Pausch

Jai Pausch became an impassioned advocate promoting pancreatic cancer research following the 2008 death of her husband, Randy Pausch, Ph.D, acclaimed Carnegie Mellon University professor and author of the international best seller, The Last Lecture. During Randy's twenty-three-month battle with cancer, Jai took on the responsibility as his cancer caregiver, learning specialised medical, palliative, and hospice care. Previously, Jai Pausch led the Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science Web team as the Director of Electronic Publications. Today, Pausch researches do-it-yourself instructional videos for home repairs and remodelling. She lives with her children, Dylan, Logan and Chloe, in Hampton Roads, Virginia.