Tracey Lawson - The Gretna Girls - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Hardback £16.99
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    • ISBN:9781473620032
    • Publication date:30 May 2017
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    • ISBN:9781473620056
    • Publication date:30 May 2017

The Gretna Girls

The WW1 munitions women who made the Devil’s Porridge

By Tracey Lawson

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473620063
  • Publication date: 30 May 2017
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Two Roads
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