Peter Snow and Ann MacMillan - War Stories - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473618275
    • Publication date:21 Sep 2017
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    • ISBN:9781473664951
    • Publication date:21 Sep 2017

War Stories

Gripping Tales of Courage, Cunning and Compassion

By Peter Snow and Ann MacMillan

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A uniquely intimate account of ordinary men and women who rose to the challenge of war with acts of great heroism and humanity

'Highly readable . . . an intimate and varied account of fascinating stories of people at war' History of War

War Stories is a fascinating account of ordinary men and women swept up in the turbulence of war. These are the stories - many untold until now - of thirty-four individuals who have pushed the boundaries of love, bravery, suffering and terror beyond the imaginable. They span three centuries and five continents. There is the courage of Edward Seager who survived the Charge of the Light Brigade; the cunning of Krystyna Skarbek, quick-thinking spy and saboteur during the Second World War; the skullduggery of Benedict Arnold, who switched sides in the American War of Independence and the compassion of Magdalene de Lancey who tenderly nursed her dying husband at Waterloo.

Told with vivid narrative flair and full of unexpected insights, War Stories moves effortlessly from tales of spies, escapes and innovation to uplifting acts of humanity, celebrating men and women whose wartime experiences are beyond compare.

Biographical Notes

Peter Snow is a highly respected journalist, author and broadcaster. He was ITN's Diplomatic and Defence Correspondent from 1966 to 1979 and presented BBC's Newsnight from 1980 to 1997. An indispensable part of election nights, he has also covered military matters on and off the world's battlefields for forty years. He presented the BBC documentaries Battlefield Britain and The World's Greatest Twentieth Century Battlefields with his son Dan. He is the author of several books including To War with Wellington and When Britain Burned the White House.

Ann MacMillan was born in Wales, the great granddaughter of David Lloyd George, and grew up in Canada where she worked for CHIN Radio, Global TV News and CTV News. She moved to London in 1976 when she married Peter Snow and worked for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation until 2013. She was the CBC's managing editor in London for the last thirteen years of her career.

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  • ISBN: 9781473618282
  • Publication date: 21 Sep 2017
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  • Imprint: John Murray
Highly readable . . . an intimate and varied account of fascinating stories of people at war . . . a very engaging and recommendable work that is well paced — History of War
The diverse scope means that it's as good to dip in and out of as it is to read cover to cover — History Revealed
Clear and energetic delivery . . . women are well represented . . . memorialises the extraordinary courage, cunning and compassion of ordinary people . . . Snow and MacMillan cover conflicts from the 18th century to the present, spanning five continents, and their subjects are not just soldiers but the full range of people affected by war: doctors, nurses, inventors ,civilians, spies and spouses . . . the book reminds us that valour can be the flip side of arrogance, recklessness or mindless patriotism — Daily Telegraph
From the SAS to spies, runners and civilian acts of bravery, commanders, traitors and war heroes, children and turncoats, those recognised and long forgotten, it is an extraordinary collection and a riveting read — Oxford Times
War Stories is written by two veteran journalists (husband and wife, a Brit and a Canadian) who know the best way to deliver an entertaining history lesson is through the stories of those who lived it. The collection covers almost three centuries and 34 men and women . . . Ten of the 34 are women, unusual in a military history — Toronto Star
Amid works about past strategies and great conflicts this book provides a different approach and a refreshing read . . . Peter Snow and his wife pace a story and hold attention . . . A serious and well researched book — Church Times
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