Shyama Perera - Do the Right Thing - Hodder & Stoughton

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Do the Right Thing

By Shyama Perera

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

Two idealistic lovers are leading the life of a Bollywood film script - until the real world encroaches in this modern retelling of the mythic Ramayana.

'Clever and original' The Sunday Mirror


She looked up into her husband's amber eyes and, smiling lazily, pulled his face against hers and kissed him with a passion.
And that really should be the end of the story, but it's only the beginning.


Like Rama and Sita, the mythical lovers of Indian history, Chita and Shyam have set themselves the ideals of fidelity, faith and family.

But, it must be said, Rama and Sita didn't live in a Docklands loft in 21st century London.

When the monsters of management consultancy rear their ugly heads, Chita fights to resist a new-found lust for money and her devilish but utterly beguiling boss Sam. A difficult battle when Sam is piling her with expensive jewellery whilst her husband Shyam is being sulky and righteous at home.

But when does it become too late to do the right thing?


A modern fairytale with a delightfully Bollywood twist, DO THE RIGHT THING is an uplifting, feel-good tale perfect for fans of Dawn O'Porter and Marian Keyes.


'Shyama Perera manages to tell a modern fairytale with intelligence, wit and charm' The List

Biographical Notes

Shyama Perera was the first Sri Lankan child to be born in Moscow. Her mother brought her to England in 1962, in vain pursuit of her father. Now a writer and broadcaster, she lives in north-west London.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781444792164
  • Publication date: 10 Apr 2014
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Sceptre
Sceptre

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'A wonderfully upbeat story celebrating optimism and friendship' The Express Paddington, London, 1966 Mala's story begins. As a young girl growing up in the late '60s and early '70s, life is full of hope for Mala as she flits from Notting Hill to Marble Arch flanked by her three best friends, Caroline, Janice and Bethany. What does it matter that they're poor when they're having this much fun? But life isn't all magazines, gorgeous boys and shiny white plastic boots for the girls. When Bethany disappears without a trace, a sinister side to the city they love begins to show itself. Thankfully, nothing has stopped these girls dancing yet.Perfect for fans of THE TROUBLE WITH GOATS AND SHEEP and ANITA AND ME comes this enchanting and deeply funny novel about a group of friends growing up in 1960s London 'Perera recalls the feel-good innocence of the 1970s with brio' Independent on Sunday'There is a warmth and tenderness towards all the characters in this optimistic, entertaining story' Sunday Mirror'A truly gorgeous book . . . Read it if you have any taste at all' Minx

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