Fred Trueman - Fred Trueman Talking Cricket - Hodder & Stoughton

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Fred Trueman Talking Cricket

By Fred Trueman

  • CD-Audio
  • £14.99

Stories of ex-England fast-bowler Fred Trueman and his meetings with celebrities.

Fred Trueman has met almost everyone in the world of cricket, and on this cassette he tells of anecdotes and dialogues between him and other great players like Don Bradman, Mike Atherton, John Major and Harold Wilson

Biographical Notes

Fred S. Trueman was born in 1931 in South Yorkshire. He went on to become England's greatest fast-bowler. Since 1968 he has become an administrator, commentator and writer on the game.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781444708448
  • Publication date: 02 Oct 1997
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
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