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Bahaa Taher

Bahaa Taher was born in 1935 in Cairo, Egypt. He was active in the country's left-wing literary circles of the 1960s and in the mid 1970s was prevented from publishing his work. After many years of exile in Switzerland, he has recently returned to Egypt. Now one of the most widely read novelists in the Arab world, Taher has received the State's Award of Merit in Literature, the highest honour the Egyptian establishment can confer on a writer. He is the author of four collections of short stories, several plays and works of non-fiction, and six novels. In 2008 he was awarded the inaugural International Prize for Arabic Fiction for SUNSET OASIS.
Kazuaki Takano

Kazuaki Takano studied Film Studies at Los Angeles City College and has worked for many years as a scriptwriter in Japan. Takano's debut novel, Thirteen Steps, won the 47th Edogawa Rampo Award for best mystery of the year in 2001. EXTINCTION was nominated for the Naoki Prize and won the Yamada Futaro Award, selling 340,000 copies since its publication in April 2011.
Sekonaia Takavesi

Sekonaia Takavesi was born in Fiji in 1943. On November 13, 1961 he enlisted in the British Army leaving the Pacific island, joining the King's Own Border Regiment. Two years later, he successfully sought selection to the SAS. He fought in the Battle of Mirbat in 1972 and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Takavesi served in the SAS for thirteen years.
Daniel Tammet

Daniel Tammet is a writer, linguist and educator. He is the author of Thinking in Numbers, Embracing the Wide Sky and the bestsellering Born on a Blue Day. He lives in Paris.
Ilka Tampke

Ilka Tampke was awarded a Glenfern Fellowship in 2012. Her short stories and articles have been published in several anthologies. She lives in Woodend, Australia. Skin is her first novel.
Adi Tantimedh

Adi Tantimedh has a BA in English Literature from Bennington College and an MFA in Film and Television Production from New York University. He is of Chinese-Thai descent and came of age in Singapore and London. He has written radio plays and television scripts for the BBC and screenplays for various Hollywood companies, as well as graphic novels for DC Comics and Big Head Press, and a weekly column about pop culture for BleedingCool.com. He wrote "Zinky Boys Go Underground," the first post-Cold War Russian gangster thriller, which won the BAFTA for Best Short Film in 1995.
Jo Tatchell

Jo Tatchell is a journalist who writes on Middle Eastern culture for UK and US media including the Guardian. Her first book, NABEEL'S SONG, was published in 2006 and was shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award; A DIAMOND IN THE DESERT followed in 2009.
Nagisa Tatsumi

Born near Tokyo in 1965, Nagisa Tatsumi is a Japanese author, journalist and commentator. She published the original edition of The Art of Discarding as Suteru! Gijutsu in Japan in 2000 where it became an overnight sensation. It has since become a million copy international bestseller and was the inspiration for Marie Kondo's The Life Changing Magic of Tidying.
Emma Taylor & Lorelei Sharkey

Em and Lo (Emma Taylor and Lorelei Sharkey), the Emily Posts of the modern bedroom, made their UK debut with a weekly column for theGuardian Weekend magazine debunking sex myths. After four years as Nerve.com's resident advice gurus and "astrologists," they can now be found dishing about all things love-, sex-, and star-related on their own website, EmandLo.com. They also write a monthly sex advice column for Men's Journal magazine in the U.S. Both live in New York City, where they spend far too much time together. THE BIG BANG is their first book and their second, SEX ETIQUETTE, will be published in 2005.
Iain Taylor

Iain Taylor has worked with Scottish television and the Scottish Examination Board.
Phil Taylor

Phil Taylor is widely regarded as the best darts player of all time, having won more than 200 professional tournaments, including 81 major titles and a record 16 World Championships. No darts player has a winning record in matches against him.He has won the PDC Player of the Year award six times (2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012) and has twice been nominated for the BBC Sports Personality of the Year, in 2006 and 2010, finishing as runner-up in the latter. He was the first, and to date, the only person to hit two nine dart finishes in one match, in the 2010 Premier League Darts final against James Wade. He has hit a record ten televised nine-dart finishes and is ranked world number two in the PDC Order of Merit.
Laini Taylor

Laini Taylor is the author of the bestselling Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband, illustrator Jim Di Bartolo, and their daughter Clementine Pie. Visit her website: www.lainitaylor.com. Follow her on Twitter: twitter.com/lainitaylor
Michael Taylor

Michael Taylor was born in Dudley and educated at Dudley Grammar School and the Birmingham College of Art and Crafts. He has beeen a songwriter and performer with the popular recording group Herbie's People, a widely published photographer and since 1990, a successful businessman. He lives in South Staffordshire with his wife and family.
Natalie Taylor

Natalie Taylor and her son, Kai Taylor, live in Royal Oak Michigan. Natalie teaches high school English and recently obtained her master's degree in education. Learn more about Natalie on her blog at ifyougiveamomacocktail.com and follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/MyHouseIsAMess.
Andrew Taylor

A bestselling crime writer, Andrew Taylor has also worked as a boatbuilder, wages clerk, librarian, labourer and publisher's reader. He has written many prizewinning crime novels and thrillers, including the William Dougal crime series, the Lydmouth crime series, the ground-breaking Roth Trilogy - which was televised as ITV's Fallen Angel - and several standalone historical crime novels.His many awards include the CWA Cartier Diamond Dagger in 2009 for sustained excellence in crime writing, an Edgar Scroll from the Mystery Writers of America, and the Crime Writers' Association Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, which he has won twice - most recently for his bestselling Richard & Judy Book Club novel, The American Boy, which was also selected for The Times Top Ten Crime Novels of the Decade. Bleeding Heart Square won Sweden's Martin Beck Award, the Golden Crowbar.Andrew Taylor is also the crime fiction reviewer of the Spectator. He lives with his wife in the Forest of Dean, on the borders of England and Wales. To find out more, visit Andrew's website, www.andrew-taylor.co.uk, and follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/andrewjrtaylor.
Jennifer Teege

Jennifer Teege has worked in advertising since 1999 and lives in Germany with her husband and two sons. In her twenties, she studied for four years in Israel, where she learned fluent Hebrew. A mixed-race woman raised by adoptive German parents, she was appalled to discover her biological family's Nazi history. Her compelling true story is stranger than fiction.
Kevin Telfer

Kevin Telfer is the author of three books including The Remarkable Story of Great Ormond Street Hospital (2008), where he first found out about J. M. Barrie and the Allahakbarries due to Barrie's fascinating connection with the hospital. He has written for the Guardian, the Sunday Times and The Idler.He was rather more athletic than Barrie as a childhood cricketer but still never managed a score of more than 12 in a competitive match and last played when he was seventeen years old. Nonetheless, he has a lifelong love of listening to cricket on the radio.
Robert Temple

PROFESSOR ROBERT TEMPLE is the author of a dozen challenging and provocative books, commencing with the international best-seller, The Sirius Mystery. His books have been translated into a total of 44 foreign languages. He is Visiting Professor of the History and Philosophy of Science at Tsinghua University in Beijing, and previously held a similar position at an American university. For many years he was a science writer for the Sunday Times, the Guardian, and a science reporter for Time-Life, as well as a frequent reviewer for Nature and profile writer for The New Scientist. He is a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, and has been a member of the Egypt Exploration Society since the 1970s, as well as a member of numerous other academic societies. He has produced, written and presented a documentary for Channel Four and National Geographic Channels on his archaeological discoveries in Greece and Italy, and he was at one time an arts reviewer on BBC Radio 4's 'Kaleidoscope'.With his wife, Olivia, he is co-author and translator of the first complete English version of Aesop's Fables, which attracted a great deal of international press attention at the time of its release, as the earlier translations had suppressed some of the fables because of Victorian prudery.Temple was a colleague of the late Dr. Joseph Needham of Cambridge, in association with whom he wrote The Genius of China, which has been approved as an official reference book (in Chinese) for the Chinese secondary school system, and which won five national awards in the USA. He has done archaeometric dating work and intensive exploration of closed sites in Egypt with the permission of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities. His research into historical accounts of the Sphinx is the first comprehensive survey ever undertaken.
Aline Templeton

Aline Templeton lives in Edinburgh with her husband, in a house with a balcony built by an astronomer to observe the stars over the beautiful city skyline. She has worked in education and broadcasting and has written numerous articles and stories for newspapers and magazines. Her books have been published in translation in several European countries as well as in the United States.
Corrie Ten Boom

Corrie ten Boom is known and loved by millions for her book, THE HIDING PLACE, which tells how her family protected Jews during the Nazi occupation of Holland. The book launched her into a worldwide ministry of speaking, teaching and writing, which lasted until her death in 1983.