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Lou Wakefield

Born and brought up in Leicester, Lou Wakefield is a writer, director and actor. Highlights of her eclectic career include being in the original cast of TOP GIRLS at the Royal Court and the Public Theatre in New York; playing Janet in the ROCKY HORROR SHOW at the King's Road Theatre in 1975, and Jackie Woodstock in THE ARCHERS. TV appearances include INSIDE OUT, MORSE, THE BILL and CASUALTY. Amongst her many television productions, she has directed CORONATION STREETand BROOKSIDE. She wrote the award winning FIRM FRIENDS for ITV, and co-writes the highly successful Ladies of Letters for BBC Radio 4, which stars Prunella Scales and Patricia Routledge.
Ayelet Waldman

Ayelet Waldman is the author of Red Hook Road, Love and Treasure and the New York Times bestseller Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities and Occasional Moments of Grace. Her novel Love and Other Impossible Pursuits was made into a film starring Natalie Portman. Her personal essays have been published in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Vogue, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal.She and her husband, the novelist Michael Chabon, live in Berkeley, California, with their four children.ayeletwaldman.comtwitter.com/ayeletwfacebook.com/ayeletwaldman
Stephen Walker

Stephen Walker read Modern History at Oxford and went on to do a Master's degree at Harvard. He was a documentary maker for the BBC for twelve years and more recently for his own company, Walker George Films. He has also directed TV drama, written films such as Death and the Maiden with Ariel Dorfmann, worked as a journalist and written two books, King of Cannes and SHOCKWAVE: COUNTDOWN TO HIROSHIMA.
Fiona Walker

Fiona Walker, whose novels have been Sunday Times bestsellers, leads the field as the voice of young, media-aware women. She lives in Somerset with her partner and two children plus an assortment of horses and dogs.
Maureen Waller

Maureen Waller read Medieval & Modern History at University College, London and took a Masters at Queen Mary College, London. She is the author of several books including London 1945 and Sovereign Ladies. She lives in London.
Guy Walters

Guy Walters is the author of three bestselling wartime thrillers The Traitor, The Leader and The Occupation, all of which have been published in USA, Holland, Japan and France. He co-edited The Voice for War, an anthology of Second World War memoirs. He was a journalist on The Times for eight years and regularly contributes to the Daily Mail.Guy Walters was a journalist on The Times for eight years, travelling around the world and reporting on a wide variety of subjects. He is married to the author Annabel Venning and they have one son. He is also the co-editor of THE VOICE OF WAR, an anthology of World War Two memoirs.
Kirsty Wark

Kirsty Wark is a journalist, broadcaster and writer who has presented a wide range of BBC programmes over the past thirty years, from the ground-breaking Late Show to the nightly current affairs show Newsnight and the weekly Arts and Cultural review and comment show, The Review Show. Kirsty has won several major awards for her work, including BAFTA Awards for Outstanding Contribution to Broadcasting, Journalist of the Year and Best Television Presenter. Her debut novel, The Legacy of Elizabeth Pringle, was published in March 2014 by Two Roads and was shortlisted for the Saltire First Book of the Year Award, as well as nominated for the 2016 International DUBLIN Literary Award. Her second novel, The House by the Loch, has been inspired by her childhood memories and family, particularly her father.Born in Dumfries and educated in Ayr, Scotland, Kirsty now lives in Glasgow.
Robert Weintraub

Robert Weintraub is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, a columnist for Slate, and the author of the acclaimed books The House That Ruth Built and The Victory Season.
Geoffrey Wellum

Geoffrey Wellum was born in Walthamstow in 1921. He joined the RAF at the age of 17 and served through the Battle of Britain, eventually leaving the RAF in 1961. He is now known world-wide after the publication of his widely-acclaimed book First Light, a memoir of his wartime experiences, which was first published in 2002 and became a bestseller. He worked in the City of London before retiring to Cornwall. He is still much in demand as a speaker at World War Two commemorative events.
Mark Bles

Mark Bles is well qualified to write about war and insurgency. Educated at Sandhurst and Oxford, he has served in the Royal Green Jackets and 22 Special Air Service Regiment. After leaving the regular army, he worked for several years as a kidnap negotiator. He has written two novels and several works of non-fiction including the acclaimed CHILD AT WAR: The True Story of Hortense Daman.
Barbara Whitnell

Barbara Whitnell spent many years in Africa, the West Indies and Hong Kong. She now divides her time between Cornwall and London. She and her husband have four grown-up children and six grand-children.
Josephine Wilkinson

Josephine Wilkinson has a BA, MPhil and PhD from the University of Newcastle. She has published four books including Mary Boleyn, the first published biography of Mary, Anne Boleyn, a book about Richard III and a collection of essays and papers on the princes in the tower. Find out more about Jo at www.josepha-josephine-wilkinson.blogspot.co.uk
Andrew Williams

Andrew Williams worked as a senior producer for the BBC's flagship Panorama and Newsnight programmes, and as a writer and director of history documentaries. He is the author of two bestselling non-fiction books, The Battle of the Atlantic and D-day to Berlin, and four acclaimed novels, The Interrogator, (shortlisted for the Ian Fleming Silver Dagger Award and the Ellis Peters Award), To Kill a Tsar, (shortlisted for the Ellis Peters Award and the Walter Scott Prize), The Poison Tide and The Suicide Club. You can find out more about Andrew Williams and his writing at www.andrewwilliams.tv and www.hodder.co.uk, and you can follow him on twitter at @AWilliamswriter or on Facebook.
Kathy Willis

Kathy Willis is director of science at Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. She is also professor of long-term ecology and a fellow of Merton College, both at Oxford University. Winner of several awards, she has spent over 20 years researching and teaching biodiversity and conservation at Oxford and Cambridge.
Ian Wooldridge

Born on 14 January, 1932, Ian Wooldridge was educated at Brockenhurst Grammar School. Despite leaving with just two O-levels in English and Art, he went on to become the most prestigious sports journalist of his era - if not of all time. His first job was with the New Milton Advertiser, but his talent saw him swiftly moving on to greater things and after spells at the Bournemouth Times, the News Chronicle and Sunday Dispatch, he found his spiritual home at the Daily Mail in 1961 where he remained until his death in 2007.The accolades to his prodigious talent are seemingly endless: winner of the British Press Awards' Columnist of the Year in 1975 and 1976; four times winner of Sportswriter of the Year Award- 1972, 1974, 1981 and 1989; Sports Council Sportswriter of the Year in 1987, 1988 and 1996; and the Sports Council's Sports Feature Writer of the Year in 1991 and 1997. In 2006 he won the London Press Club's Edgar Wallace Award for his lifetime's contribution to journalism. As well as his articles he made television documentaries for the BBC, and wrote six books: Cricket, Lovely Cricket (1963); Mary P with Mary Peters (1974); MCC: the Autobiography of a Cricketer with Colin Cowdrey (1976); The Best of Wooldridge (1978); Travelling Reserve (1982); and Sport in the Eighties (1989).He married married twice - to Veronica Churcher in 1957 with whom he had three sons, and then to Sarah Chappell Lourenço in 1980, his wife for the rest of his life.
Sally Worboyes

Sally Worboyes was born and grew up in Stepney with four brothers and a sister, and she brings some of the raw history of her own family background to her East End sagas. She now lives in Norfolk with her husband, with whom she has three grown-up children. She has written several plays which have been broadcast on Anglia Television and Radio Four. She also adapted her own play and novel, WILD HOPS, as a musical, The Hop Pickers.
Lucy Worsley

Lucy Worsley is an historian, author, curator and television presenter. Lucy read history at New College, Oxford and worked for English Heritage before becoming Chief Curator at the charity Historic Royal Palaces. She also presents history programmes for the BBC, and her bestselling books include Jane Austen at Home, A Very British Murder: The Curious Story of how Crime was Turned into Art, If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home, Courtiers: the Secret History of the Georgian Court and Cavalier: The Story of a 17th century Playboy.
Andrea Wulf

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in England. She is the author of several acclaimed books. The Brother Gardeners won the American Horticultural Society Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize. Her book Founding Gardeners was on the New York Times bestseller list. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. She appears regularly on TV and radio.
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