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Tarquin Hall

Tarquin Hall became an under-age journalist at nineteen and spent the next ten years working in Africa, America, Asia and the Middle East. He is the author of Mercenaries, Missionaries and Misfits, an account of his early adventures and To the Elephant Graveyard: A True Story of the Hunt for a Man-killing Elephant, a BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week. He is married to the BBC World Service presenter Anu Anand. They live in East London.
Nick Harkaway

Nick Harkaway is the author of two novels, The Gone-Away World and Angelmaker and a regular blogger for the Bookseller's FutureBook website. From 1999 to 2008, he was a jobbing scriptwriter. During that time he also wrote brochure copy for a company selling bottle-capping machinery, and the website text for an exclusive lingerie boutique. He lives in London with his wife Clare, a human rights lawyer, and his daughter Clemency.
Robin Harris

Robin Harris studied at Oxford University, won the Gibbs Prize, and obtained a DPhil in modern history. In the 1970s and 1980s he worked in various political and governmental capacities, and is now consultant director of the London-based Politeia think tank and a regular contributor to a range of British and American journals, mainly on politics and foreign affairs.
Robin Harvie

In 2000 Robin Harvie ran his first marathon after a bet. Since then he has run many more.
Selina Hastings

Selina Hastings is a writer and literary journalist who worked on the Daily Telegraph for fourteen years, and subsequently became the literary editor for Harpers and Queen. Prior to writing THE SECRET LIVES OF SOMERSET MAUGHAM, she published biographies of Nancy Mitford, Evelyn Waugh and Rosamond Lehmann. Her biography of Waugh won the Marsh biography prize.
Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking is the former Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and author of A Brief History of Time which was an international bestseller. He is now the Dennis Stanton Avery and Sally Tsui Wong-Avery Director of Research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and Founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge.
Zebedee Helm

Zebedee Helm, despite a silly name, has a serious career as a cartoonist. He has cooked squirrels professionally, been the Morris Dancing correspondent for The Lady, and written a children's book.
Mick Herron

Mick Herron's first Jackson Lamb novel, Slow Horses, was described as the 'most enjoyable British spy novel in years' by the Mail on Sunday and picked as one of the best twenty spy novels of all time by the Daily Telegraph. The second, Dead Lions, won the 2013 CWA Goldsboro Gold Dagger. The third, Real Tigers, was shortlisted for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year, and both the CWA Goldsboro Gold Dagger and the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger. The fourth, Spook Street, was shortlisted for the Gold Dagger and won the Steel Dagger. London Rules is the fifth.Mick Herron was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, and now lives in Oxford.
Peter Hessler

Peter Hessler is a correspondent for the New Yorker and a contributor to National Geographic. He is the author of ORACLE BONES and RIVER TOWN, which won the 2001 Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize. In 2011 he was awarded a MacArthur Foundation 'genius grant'. Born in Columbia, Missouri, he now lives in Cairo with his wife and daughters.
Bevis Hillier

Bevis Hillier devoted more than twenty-five years to writing Betjeman`s life, a task entrusted to him by the poet himself. Like Betjeman he was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. Later he joined The Times, became editor of The Connoisseur and a columnist on the Los Angeles Times, as well as writing for many other papers and journals. He edited Betjeman`s 'Uncollected Poems' now included in COLLECTED POEMS, compiled JOHN BETJEMAN: A LIFE IN PICTURES and is the author of YOUNG BETJEMAN, NEW FAME, NEW LIFE and THE BONUS OF LAUGHTER. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and the Royal Society of Literature. He lives in Hampshire.
Henry Hitchings

Henry Hitchings was born in 1974. He has contributed to many newspapers and magazines, and is theatre critic for the Evening Standard.
Simon Hoggart

Born in 1946, Simon Hoggart is the eldest child of the writer and academic Richard Hoggart. After Cambridge he worked for the Guardian in Northern Ireland, Africa, and Westminster. He joined the Observer in 1991 as US correspondent, based in Washington, then returned to the UK to rejoin the political world. From 1996 to 2006 he chaired the News Quiz on Radio 4, and in 2001 became wine correspondent at the Spectator.
Julia Hollander

Julia Hollander is a mother and writer living in Oxford.
Meredith Hooper

Meredith Hooper has the rare, possibly unique, distinction of being selected as a writer in Antarctica by three government programmes - the US National Science Foundation Artists and Writers Program, twice; by the British Admiralty, travelling on HMS Endurance, and by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions. She has written a range of books and articles on Antarctica (general market, academic, children's). Meredith Hooper is a UK Trustee of the Brussels-based International Polar Foundation, a Trustee of the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust and served as a juror on the British Antarctic Survey's Artists and Writers Programme. She was awarded the Antarctica Service Medal by the US Congress in 2000. Meredith was born in Australia and has been living in the UK since taking up a scholarship at Oxford to do post-graduate research.
Peter Hopkirk

Peter Hopkirk travelled widely in the regions where his six books are set: Central Asia, the Caucasus, China, Russia, India and Pakistan, Iran, and Eastern Turkey. He worked as an ITN reporter, the New York correspondent of the old Daily Express, and - for twenty years - on The Times. No stranger to misadventure, he was twice held in secret police cells and has was also hijacked by Arab terrorists. His works have been translated into many languages. All six of his books are available from John Murray: THE GREAT GAME, ON SECRET SERVICE EAST OF CONSTANTINOPLE, SETTING THE EAST ABLAZE, TRESPASSERS ON THE ROOF OF THE WORLD, FOREIGN DEVILS ON THE SILK ROAD and QUEST FOR KIM.
Tony Horwitz

Tony Horwitz, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting for the Wall Street Journal, is the author of CONFEDERATES IN THE ATTIC, BAGHDAD WITHOUT A MAP, ONE FOR THE ROAD and INTO THE BLUE, a New York Times bestseller. He lives in Martha's Vineyard with his wife, Geraldine Brooks, and their son Nathaniel.
Michael Hughes

Michael Hughes was born and raised in Keady, Northern Ireland, and now lives in London. He attended St Patrick's Grammar School, Armagh, and read English at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He trained in theatre at the Jacques Lecoq School in Paris, and has worked for many years as an actor, under the professional name Michael Colgan. He studied creative writing at Royal Holloway, and at London Metropolitan University, where he also taught. His first novel, The Countenance Divine, was published by John Murray in 2016. Country is his second novel.
Declan Hughes

Declan Hughes was born in Dublin, where he lives with his wife and daughters. He has worked as a playwright and director and co-founded the award-winning Rough Magic Theatre Company, where he was artistic director and writer-in-residence. The first in the series of Ed Loy mysteries, The Wrong Kind of Blood, won the Shamus Award for best first novel and the third, The Dying Breed, was nominated for the prestigious Edgar Allan Poe award for best novel.
Andrew Michael Hurley

Andrew Michael Hurley has lived in Manchester and London, and is now based in Lancashire. His first novel, The Loney, was originally published by Tartarus Press, a tiny independent publisher based in Yorkshire, as a 300-copy limited-edition, before being republished by John Murray and going on to win the Costa Best First Novel Award and Book of the Year at the British Book Industry Awards in 2016.
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