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Emily Mackie

Emily Mackie was born in Winchester in 1983 and grew up in Scotland. After graduating with an MA in Creative Writing from Bath Spa University in 2007, her first novel, And This is True, was published in 2010 and was shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize as well as the Saltire Scottish First Book of the Year Award. Her second novel, In Search of Solace, was published by Sceptre in 2014.
John Macleod

Born in Lochaber in 1966, John Macleod is the son of the Highland manse. After graduation he worked for BBC Highland in Inverness and currently writes a column for Glasgow's Herald newspaper. His work has featured in the Scottish and English press and in 1991 he won the trophy for Scottish Journalist of the Year. He lives in Harris in the Outer Hebrides with his small dog, Smudge.
Andreï Makine

Andreï Makine was born in Krasnoyarsk in Siberia in 1957, but sought asylum in France in 1987. While initially sleeping rough in Paris he was writing his first novel, A HERO'S DAUGHTER, which was eventually published in 1990 after Makine pretended it had been translated from the Russian, since no publisher believed he could have written it in French. With his third novel, ONCE UPON A RIVER LOVE, he was finally published as a 'French' writer, and with his fourth, LE TESTAMENT FRANCAIS, he became the first author to win both of France's top literary prizes, the Prix Goncourt and Prix Médicis. Since then Andreï Makine has written THE CRIME OF OLGA ARBYELINA, REQUIEM FOR THE EAST, A LIFE'S MUSIC, which won the Grand Prix RTL-Lire, THE EARTH AND SKY OF JACQUES DORME, THE WOMAN WHO WAITED, HUMAN LOVE and THE LIFE OF AN UNKNOWN MAN.
Tom Malmquist

Tom Malmquist (b. 1978) is a poet. He has written two highly acclaimed poetry collections. Every Moment We Are Still Alive is his first work of prose."Writing for me is to be five years old and to doze off to the rattle of my dad's journalist fingers running across his IBM Selectric Typewriter. It is also to fantasize about how Ryszard Kapuscinski sat down to write the introduction to Imperium, or how W. G. Sebald finished Austerlitz, or Marguerite Duras The Lover, Goethe, Shakespeare, Elfriede Jelinek, or Calvino, Camus, Sigmund Freud, T S Eliot or Sandra who sent me a love letter over thirty years ago. It is also tangible: I write when my daughter is in kindergarten, I write for her to fall asleep and I write when she wakes up."
Rachel Manija Brown

Rachel Manija Brown is an award-winning scriptwriter and comedy writer. She has also been a disaster relief worker, a stage manager and a teacher for kids who've been expelled. She is 28 and lives in Hollywood.
Willa Marsh

Willa Marsh is the pseudonym of Marcia Willett, who has written several books for Headline which have been published with great success. In 1982 her husband was commissioned to write a book on sailing and they moved on board their ketch for twelve months, during which she started to write. Marcia Willett lives with her husband and their two Newfoundland dogs in a small Devon village on the edge of Dartmoor.
Iain Martin

Iain Martin is a commentator on politics and economics. He has been editor of the Scotsman and of Scotland on Sunday and Deputy Editor of the Sunday Telegraph. He has written for the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the Daily Mail and Standpoint magazine. His first book, Making It Happen: Fred Goodwin, RBS, and the Men who Blew Up the British Economy, was shortlisted for the 2013 Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award and won the Debut Book of the Year prize at the 2014 Political Book Awards.
Allan Massie

Allan Massie is the award-winning author of many novels, including his Roman Quartet - Antony, Augustus, Tiberius and Caesar - as well as several works of non-fiction. He lives in the Scottish Borders and writes for the Daily Telegraph and the Scotsman.
Kopano Matlwa

Kopano Matlwa Mabaso is a South African author whose bestselling first novel, Coconut , written when she was 21 years old, went on to in the European Union Literary Award and was joint winner of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa. Her second novel, Spilt Milk made the long list for the 2011 Sunday Times Fiction Prize. Matlwa is also winner of Aspen Ideas Award for medical innovation and is currently reading for a DPhil in Population Health at the University of Oxford, as a Rhodes Scholar. Her third novel Evening Primrose will be published by Sceptre in 2017. @kopanomabaso
Mark Maxwell

Mark Maxwell lives in Illinois. THAT OTHER LIFETIME is his first novel.
James Mcbride

James McBride is an award-winning writer and musician. He has been a staff writer for the Washington Post, People magazine, and the Boston Globe. His memoir and tribute to his mother, The Color of Water, spent more than two years on the New York Times bestseller list, was published worldwide, and was the winner of the prestigious Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. As a composer, he won the American Music Theater Festival's Stephen Sondheim Award for his jazz/pop musical Bobos, and has composed songs for Anita Baker, Grover Washington Jr., and Gary Burton. A jazz saxophonist, he has performed with Rachelle Farrell and with legendary jazz performer Little Jimmy Scott. He lives in Pennsylvania.
Pete Mccarthy

Pete McCarthy wrote and performed many series for radio and television, including 'Desperately Seeking Something', 'Country Tracks' and 'Travelog', for which he has won the Travelex Award for Best TV Writer. MCCARTHY'S BAR sold nearly a million copies and won him the newcomer of the year prize at the British Book Awards in 2002. He passed away in 2002.
Grace McCleen

Grace McCleen's first novel, The Land of Decoration, was published in 2012 and was awarded the Desmond Elliott Prize for the best first novel of the year. It was also chosen for Richard & Judy's Book Club and won her the Betty Trask Prize in 2013. Her second novel, The Professor of Poetry, was published by Sceptre in 2013 and was shortlisted for the Encore Award. She read English at the University of Oxford and has an MA from York, and currently lives in London.
Fiona McFarlane

Fiona McFarlane was born in Sydney, has a BA from Sydney University and a PhD from Cambridge University, and holds an MFA from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was a Michener Fellow and won the university's prestigious Keene Prize for Literature in 2012. Her work has been published in the New Yorker, Zoetrope: All-Story, Southerly, The Missouri Review, and Best Australian Stories, and she has received fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Phillips Exeter Academy, and the Australia Council for the Arts. Her debut novel, The Night Guest, was published by Sceptre in 2014.
Dinaw Mengestu

Dinaw Mengestu was born in Ethiopia in 1978 and raised in Illinois. His first novel, Children of the Revolution (published in the US as The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears), won the Guardian First Book Award in 2008, as well as the Los Angeles Times Book Award and the Prix du Premier Roman Étranger. It was followed by How to Read the Air in 2010.Mengestu's novels have been translated into more than a dozen languages and his fiction and journalism have been published in the New Yorker, Granta, Harper's, Rolling Stone, and the Wall Street Journal. He was chosen for the 5 under 35 Award by the National Book Foundation in 2007 and was one of the New Yorker's 20 under 40 in 2010. In 2012, he was the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award. He currently lives with his family in New York.
Andrew Miller

Andrew Miller's first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published by Sceptre in 1997 and greeted as the debut of an outstanding new writer. It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Grinzane Cavour Prize for the best foreign novel published in Italy.It has been followed by Casanova, Oxygen, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel of the Year Award in 2001, The Optimists, One Morning Like A Bird, Pure, which won the Costa Book of the Year Award 2011, and The Crossing.Andrew Miller's novels have been published in translation in twenty countries. Born in Bristol in 1960, he currently lives in Somerset.
David Mitchell

David Mitchell is the author of the novels Ghostwritten, number9dream, Cloud Atlas, Black Swan Green, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, The Bone Clocks and Slade House. He has won the John Llewellyn Rhys, Geoffrey Faber Memorial and South Bank Show Literature Prizes, and been shortlisted twice for the Booker Prize. In 2003, David Mitchell was selected as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists.
Drummond Moir

Drummond Moir grew up in Edinburgh and studied at St Anne's College, Oxford and Daiichi Keizai University in Fukuoka, Japan. He has worked in publishing since 2006 and is currently Editorial Director at Sceptre.
Jules Montague

Jules Montague is a consultant neurologist in London, a job she combines with work in Mozambique and India each year. Originally from a seaside town in Ireland, Jules studied Medicine at Trinity College, Dublin. Her clinical sub-specialty is young-onset dementia - patients who develop memory and behavioural changes as early as their twenties. Some of her most challenging work is in the intensive care setting where she sees patients who have suffered catastrophic brain injuries. She writes regularly for the Guardian and her work has also been featured in Granta, Mosaic, Aeon, NME, The Verge, the Independent, the Lancet, and on the BBC.
Clare Morrall

Clare Morrall's first novel, Astonishing Splashes of Colour, was published in 2003 and shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize that year. She has since published the novels Natural Flights of the Human Mind, The Language of Others, The Man Who Disappeared, which was a TV Book Club Summer Read in 2010, The Roundabout Man and After the Bombing.Born in Exeter, Clare Morrall now lives in Birmingham. She works as a music teacher, and has two daughters.