Find your favourite award winner, best seller or debut talent Author from Hodder and Stoughton Publisher
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Al Sarrantonio

Al Sarantonio is an expert editor in this field and he has edited collections of horror writing with top auithors of the genre including Stephen King.
Dreda Say Mitchell

Dreda Say Mitchell is the bestselling and critically acclaimed author of Spare Room, the Gangland Girls and Flesh and Blood series, as well as the DI Rio Wray thrillers Vendetta and Death Trap. Her debut was awarded the CWA's John Creasey Dagger and she chaired the Harrogate Crime Fiction Festival in 2011. Since her sixth book she has been co-writing with Tony Mason. She has been a frequent guest on television and radio including Question Time, BBC Breakfast, Newsnight, Victoria Derbyshire, The Stephen Nolan Show, Front Row, Woman's Hour and numerous others. She has also presented Radio 4's Open Book. Dreda was named one of Britain's 50 Remarkable Women by Lady Geek in association with Nokia. She was born and raised in the East End of London where she continues to live.
Frank Schätzing

Frank Schätzing has had a career as a marketing executive as well as being the author of several highly successful historical crime novels, and he lives and writes in Cologne.Schätzing became Germany's most successful thriller writer in decades when he published Der Schwarm in 2004. THE SWARM (Der Schwarm) topped the German bestseller charts for over a year after it was published, and was translated into English and published by Hodder in the UK in 2006. Uma Thurman bought the film rights to THE SWARM in May 2006, which is now in development and due for release in 2010.
Kirsty Scott

Born in Glasgow in 1962, Kirsty was educated at the High School of Dundee and Edinburgh University. She won an international journalism scholarship to study in America and returned to the UK to work as a reporter, feature writer and columnist for Scottish and UK national newspapers. She is currently a correspondent for the Guardian, and a frequent contributor to BBC Radio Scotland. Kirsty's first novel, MOTHER'S DAY, was published in 2006. The story of three women who meet through their daughters' school was a Sunday Times bestseller. Her second novel, BETWEEN YOU AND ME, was published in 2007, and her third novel, FORTUNE HOUSE, was published in May, 2009 in hardback and will be published in paperback in September 2009. Aged 46, Kirsty is married with two children and lives in Stirlingshire.
Belinda Seaward

Belinda Seaward began her career as a journalist and has worked on national newspapers, including the Daily Mail and Sunday Times. She has also spent time on a coffee plantation in Zambia and in the Middle East, and now lives and works in Devon, where she has raised two Arab horses. You can follow Belinda on Twitter at www.twitter.com/belindasea.
Erich Segal

Erich Segal was born in Brooklyn in 1937 and graduated from Harvard with a B.A. in 1958, followed by a Masters and a Doctorate. He first made his name as an academic writer in the field of classical literature before moving on to write the book that made him famous - LOVE STORY, which published in 1970 and went on to sell over 21 million copies worldwide - and seven other romantic bestsellers. In 1998 he was awarded the Legion d'Honneur from the French government. He was married and had two children. Erich Segal died in London in 2010.
Anya Seton

Anya Seton was born in New York City and grew up on her father's large estate in Cos Cob and Greenwich, Connecticut, where visiting Indians taught her Indian dancing and woodcraft. One Sioux chief called her Anutika, which means 'cloud grey eyes', a name which the family shortened to Anya. She was educated by governesses, and then travelled abroad, first to England, then to France where she hoped to become a doctor. She studied for a while at the Hotel Dieu hospital in Paris before marrying at eighteen and having three children. She began writing in 1938 with a short story sold to a newspaper syndicate and the first of her novels was published in 1941. She died in 1990.
Leife Shallcross

Leife Shallcross lives at the foot of a mountain in Canberra, Australia, with her family and a small, scruffy creature that snores. She has a tendency to overindulge in reading fairy tales, then lie awake at night listening to trolls (or maybe possums) galloping over her tin roof. Ever since she can remember, she has been fascinated by stories about canny fairy godmothers, heroic goose girls and handsome princes disguised as bears. She is particularly inspired by those characters that tend to fall into the cracks of the usual tales. She is the author of several short stories, including Pretty Jennie Greenteeth, which won the 2016 Aurealis Award for Best Young Adult Short Story. The Beast's Heart is her first novel.
Kelly Simmons

Based in Philadelphia, where she lives with her husband and three children, Kelly Simmons works in communications. She is the author of two novels - SKYLIGHT and THE BIRDHOUSE.
Sherry Sonnett

Sherry Sonnett is a former Hollywood screenwriter.
Julia Stagg

Julia Stagg lived in the Ariège-Pyrenees region of France for six years where she ran a small auberge and tried to convince the French that the British can cook. Having done her bit for Anglo-Gallic gastronomic relations, she now divides her time between the Yorkshire Dales and the Pyrenees. You can find out more on her website www.jstagg.com or on Facebook www.facebook.com/staggjulia and follow her on Twitter @juliastagg.
Mary Stewart

Mary Stewart was one of the 20th century's bestselling and best-loved novelists. She was born in Sunderland, County Durham in 1916, but lived for most of her life in Scotland, a source of much inspiration for her writing. Her first novel, Madam, Will You Talk? was published in 1955 and marked the beginning of a long and acclaimed writing career. In 1971 she was awarded the International PEN Association's Frederick Niven Prize for The Crystal Cave, and in 1974 the Scottish Arts Council Award for one of her children's books, Ludo and the Star Horse. She was married to the Scottish geologist Frederick Stewart, and died in 2014.
Julian Stockwin

Julian Stockwin was sent at the age of fourteen to Indefatigable, a tough sea-training school. He joined the Royal Navy at fifteen before transferring to the Royal Australian Navy, where he served for eight years in the Far East, Antarctic waters and the South Seas. In Vietnam he saw active service in a carrier task force. After leaving the Navy (rated Petty Officer), Julian practised as an educational psychologist. He lived for some time in Hong Kong, where he was commissioned into the Royal Naval Reserve. He was awarded the MBE and retired with the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He now lives in Devon with his wife Kathy. More information can be found on his website at www.julianstockwin.com.
Amy Stout

Amy Stout has worked in magazine and book publishing since 1983. Her most recent roles were as editor at the Roc and Del Rey science fiction and fantasy imprints. She lives in California.
Bernadette Strachan

Bernadette Strachan is the author of six novels and lives in London.
Terence Strong

Terence Strong, the author of many bestselling thrillers, is renowned for his detailed and authoritative research. A freelance journalist and writer, he has a keen interest in international, political and military affairs, and special forces in particular.
David Suchet

David Suchet CBE is an acclaimed British actor. He has enjoyed great success with the RSC and in London's West End. He is best known in television for his portrayal of Agatha Christie's detective Hercule Poirot. He is also a practising Anglican. In 2012 he made a series for the BBC called 'In the Footsteps of St Paul'. Follow him on Twitter @David_Suchet
Jonathan Swift

Jonathan Swift was born in Dublin in 1667, after the death of his father. A cousin of Dryden, he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and for much of his early life travelled frequently between Ireland and England. Swift became increasingly occupied with Irish affairs, and wrote a great number of works including celebrated satires like 'A Tale of a Tub' and A Modest Proposal', political pamphlets and Gulliver's Travels - all informed by his sense of the Whigs' unfair treatment of Ireland. Nearly all of his works were published anonymously, and he only received payment for Gulliver's Travels. He died, after a long illness in 1745.
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