Irina Ratushinskaya - Hodder & Stoughton

Irina Ratushinskaya



Born in Odessa, Ukraine in 1954, Irina Ratushinskaya is one of the leading contemporary Russian poets. She married Igor Gerashchenko, a human rights activist, in 1979 and became involved in the human rights movement. She spent four years in a labour camp for 'anti-Soviet agitation and propaganda' where she managed to smuggle out her poems. They were published in the collection No, I'm Not Afraid. After a series of hunger strikes, Irina was released and came to Britain. Her story is told in Grey Is The Colour Of Hope and In The Beginning. She and her husband now live in London.
Books currently available by this author

Date published: New > Old

Sceptre

Fictions and Lies

Irina Ratushinskaya
Authors:
Irina Ratushinskaya

In FICTIONS AND LIES, a writer dies suddenly, in fear of KGB pursuit. His last manuscript, which is thought to be dangerously anti-Soviet, is missing from his apartment, so immediately becomes the object of a rapid police search. As it is traced, whom will it implicate, and what else will it reveal? Deftly, we are led into a world where right and wrong are problematic in ways we never experienced in the West, where integrity and self-respect may prove costly for one's family and friends, where compromise may prove unexpectedly difficult to avoid, and yet where truth and honesty matter all the more for being so elusive.

Sceptre

The Odessans

Irina Ratushinskaya
Authors:
Irina Ratushinskaya
Sceptre

In the Beginning

Irina Ratushinskaya
Authors:
Irina Ratushinskaya
Sceptre

Grey is the Colour of Hope

Irina Ratushinskaya
Authors:
Irina Ratushinskaya

If it ever falls to you, my reader (though God forbid!) to see your name written on a prison wall and followed by the letters 'LYMTL', that will simply mean 'Love You More Than Life'. These letters are no harder to remember than 'KGB'. GREY IS THE COLOUR OF HOPE is the searing account of the author's experiences in a brutal Soviet labour camp. Only twenty-eight when she was imprisoned for her poetry, Irina Ratushinskaya was already regarded as a leading writer of her generation, in the line of Mandelstam and Pushkin. She nearly died from maltreatment and a series of hunger strikes before eventually finding freedom. With surprising moments of humour, her inspiring memoir reveals how a group of incarcerated women built for themselves a life of selfless courage, order and mutual support.