Stephen Games - Hodder & Stoughton

Stephen Games



Stephen Games writes about architecture and language. He was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, made documentaries for BBC Radio 3 and has worked for the Independent, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, and was deputy editor of the RIBA Journal. In 2002, he edited the radio talks of Nikolaus Pevsner. He has edited several collections of John Betjeman's work including TRAINS AND BUTTERED TOAST, TENNIS WHITES AND TEACAKES and BETJEMAN'S ENGLAND.
Books currently available by this author

Date published: New > Old

John Murray

Tennis Whites and Teacakes

John Betjeman, Stephen Games
Authors:
John Betjeman, Stephen Games
John Murray

Betjeman's England

John Betjeman, Stephen Games, John Betjeman
Authors:
John Betjeman, Stephen Games, John Betjeman

For more than half a century Betjeman's writings have awakened readers to the intimacy of English places - from the smell of gaslight in suburban churches, to the hissing of backwash on a shingle beach. Betjeman is England's greatest topologist: whether he's talking about a townhall or a teashop, he gets to the nub of what makes unexpected places unique. This new collection of his writings, arranged geographically, offers an essential gazetteer to the physical landmarks of Betjeman Country. A new addition to the popular series of Betjeman anthologies, following on from Trains and Buttered Toast and Tennis Whites and Teacakes, this is a treasure trove for any Betjeman fan and for anyone with a love for the rare, curious and unique details of English life.

John Murray

Trains and Buttered Toast

John Betjeman, Stephen Games
Authors:
John Betjeman, Stephen Games

Eccentric, sentimental and homespun, John Betjeman's passions were mostly self-taught. He saw his country being devastated by war and progress and he waged a private war to save it. His only weapons were words - the poetry for which he is best known and, even more influential, the radio talks that first made him a phenomenon. From fervent pleas for provincial preservation to humoresques on eccentric vicars and his own personal demons, Betjeman's talks combined wit, nostalgia and criticism in a way that touched the soul of his listeners from the 1930s to the 1950s. Now collected in book form for the first time, his broadcasts represent one of the most compelling archives of twentieth-century broadcasting, reawakening the modern reader to Betjeman's unique perspective and the compelling magic of the golden age of wireless.