Related to: 'Just My Typo'

Drummond Moir

Drummond Moir grew up in Edinburgh and studied at St Anne's College, Oxford and Daiichi Keizai University in Fukuoka, Japan. He has worked in publishing since 2006 and is currently Editorial Director at Sceptre.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Great Northern Cookbook

Sean Wilson
Authors:
Sean Wilson

"This journey has given me the exciting opportunity to bring my cooking life full circle, and to introduce you to the very best recipes from the North of England. I've been able to delve deep into the diverse cultures, histories and traditions of the North and, of course, Northern food. The results of my travels, my many tastings, meals and experiments, are presented here, in a book that revels in its Northernness!" SEAN WILSON Britain is a nation built on its food, and nowhere has a richer heritage than the North of England. In The Great Northern Cookbook, Sean Wilson - former Coronation Street actor now award-winning cheese-maker and chef - is our guide to the culinary highlights of the North. A proud Lancastrian, Sean serves up timeless recipes and reveals the history behind the foods you love. In The Great Northern Cookbook you'll find homely hotpots and pies, alongside beef stew with melting dumplings, and a recipe for the soft, warm oven-bottom muffins. With soups to feed an army, traditional sweet treats, delicious Northern curries, and of course timeless Yorkshire puddings with mushy peas and gravy, Sean serves up the greats from Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cumbria and Northumberland. Embrace the Northern passion for simple food, made with good, authentic ingredients. Tying in to a new TV series, The Great Northern Cookbook is packed with delicious and affordable recipes you'll want to eat and share

Chapter One

COME SUNDAY, by Isla Morley

Read the first chapter of Isla Morley's COME SUNDAY.

Kevin Powers wins

Guardian First Book Award

Iraq veteran and poet Kevin Powers' unforgettable depiction of the psychological impact of war has won the Guardian First Book Award. Editor Drummond Moir says: 'It's a wonderful moment for Kevin and everyone here is absolutely thrilled.'

The Shortlist for the Sceptre Writing Prize has been Announced

Writing the future for Scottish novelists

Get the eBooks at a great price throughout July!

The Saint for £2.99

To celebrate the reissues of Leslie Charteris' classic series The Saint, you can pick up any of the current eBooks for the very special price of only £2.99. This offer is available on Kindle, Kobo and iOS devices, and you can find all of the links to your relevant store below. Whether you're a long-time fan or looking to discover something new, there has never been a better time to download one of The Saint's adventures! Amazon Kindle Kobo Books iBookstore

I. The Bride for Whom We Dance. The Eleventh Year of the Era of Kansei. 1799.

THE THOUSAND AUTUMNS OF JACOB DE ZOET, by David Mitchell

Read the first chapter of David Mitchell's brilliant THE THOUSAND AUTUMNS OF JACOB DE ZOET.

Sceptre

Scarp

Nick Papadimitriou
Authors:
Nick Papadimitriou

AN INDEPENDENT BOOK OF THE YEAR An extraordinary book by a man with a unique and inspiring perspective, SCARP will change the way you view the places and spaces around you, and reveal a forgotten London you never knew existed. Nick Papadimitriou has spent a lifetime living on the margins, walking and documenting the landscapes surrounding his home in Child's Hill, North London, in a study he calls Deep Topography. Part meditation on nature and walking, part memoir and part social history, his arresting debut is first and foremost a personal inquiry into the spirit of a place: a 14-mile broken ridge of land on the fringes of Northern London known as Scarp. Conspicuous but largely forgotten, a vast yet largely invisible presence hovering just beyond the metropolis, Scarp is a vast storehouse of regional memory. We join the author as he explores and reimagines this brooding, pregnant landscape, meticulously observing his surroundings, finding surprising connections and revealing lost slices of the past. SCARP captures the satisfying experience of a long, reflective walk. Whether talking about the beauty of a bird or a telegraph pole, deaths at a roundabout or his own troubled past, Papadimitriou celebrates the poetry in the everyday. His captivating prose reveals that the world around us is alive and intrinsically valuable in ways that the trappings of day-to-day life lead us to forget, and allows us to re-connect with something more authentic, more immediate, more profound.

Sceptre

The Rules: The Way of the Cycling Disciple

The Velominati
Authors:
The Velominati

THE WAY OF THE CYCLING DISCIPLE Rule #6: Free your mind and your legs will follow. Rule #9: If you cycle in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period. Rule #12: The correct number of bikes to own is n+1, where n is the number of bikes currently owned. THE VELOMINATI embrace cycling not as a pastime, but as a way of life, as obsessed with style, heritage, authenticity and wisdom as with performance. THE RULES is their Bible. It is an essential part of every cyclist's arsenal - whether you're grudgingly cycling to work in the rain or gearing up to be the next Bradley Wiggins, Chris Hoy or Victoria Pendleton. velominati.com twitter.com/velominati facebook.com/velominati velominati.tumblr.com/ youtube.com/velominati

John Murray

Unmentionables

Ralph Keyes
Authors:
Ralph Keyes
Hodder & Stoughton

Never Eat Shredded Wheat

Christopher Somerville
Authors:
Christopher Somerville
Teach Yourself

Writer's Guide to Good Style: Teach Yourself

Katherine Lapworth
Authors:
Katherine Lapworth

Do you want to write more effectively, correctly and in a manner which is appropriate for this brave new world of text speak and blogging? Whether you are a professional writer, or writing for your profession, a journalist, non-fiction writer, or simply a would-be blogger, you will find essential guidance and the latest style rules in this book. It contains firstly a detailed breakdown of both the rules of grammar, punctuation and spelling and, secondly, a guide to making your work readable, structured and well-paced. Unlike any other style guide, it also sets out the new and evolving rules for 21st century writing such as blogging, chatrooms, and even PowerPoint presentations.

John Murray

The Adventures of Herge

Michael Farr
Authors:
Michael Farr

Hergé is best known in Britain and throughout the world as the creator of Tintin, the dauntless young reporter-hero of the strip cartoon that first appeared in 1929 to instant acclaim. The Adventures of Tintin remain a constant point of reference throughout this new book which draws on fresh material found in the extensive archives of the Hergé Foundation as well as interviews with those who knew Hergé intimately, including his friends and colleagues. This lavishly illustrated book examines the life and passions of a man who, despite his fame, preferred to avoid the limelight, finding inspiration in modern art, the latest scientific developments and world affairs, and seeking enlightenment in Zen Buddhism and philosophy. It establishes the pivotal role played by cinema in his development of the strip cartoon, from the slapstick of the 1920s through the suspense of the pre-war Hitchcock thrillers to the early works of Steven Spielberg - the one filmmaker he believed could bring Tintin successfully to the screen. Apart from the strip cartoons that made his name, Hergé was an accomplished graphic designer and typographer and his highly advanced work for advertising is reviewed as well as his later attempts at becoming an abstract painter. Not only was Hergé fascinated by modern art, but he also became an avid collector. He greatly admired the Pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, buying major works of theirs, and they in turn paid tribute to him.

Sceptre

The Teleportation Accident

Ned Beauman
Authors:
Ned Beauman

NED BEAUMAN HAS BEEN NAMED AS ONE OF GRANTA MAGAZINE'S BEST OF YOUNG BRITISH NOVELISTS 2013 LONGLISTED FOR THE 2012 MAN BOOKER PRIZE AN OBSERVER BOOK OF THE YEAR A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR AN EVENING STANDARD BOOK OF THE YEAR The fantastically inventive, ingenious and hilarious second novel from Ned Beauman, author of the acclaimed and prizewinning BOXER, BEETLE. HISTORY HAPPENED WHILE YOU WERE HUNGOVER When you haven't had sex in a long time, it feels like the worst thing that could ever happen to anyone. If you're living in Germany in the 1930s, it probably isn't. But that's no consolation to Egon Loeser, whose carnal misfortunes will push him from the experimental theatres of Berlin to the absinthe bars of Paris to the physics laboratories of Los Angeles, trying all the while to solve two mysteries: whether it was really a deal with Satan that claimed the life of his hero, the great Renaissance stage designer Adriano Lavicini; and why a handsome, clever, charming, modest guy like him can't, just once in a while, get himself laid. From the author of the acclaimed BOXER, BEETLE comes a historical novel that doesn't know what year it is; a noir novel that turns all the lights on; a romance novel that arrives drunk to dinner; a science fiction novel that can't remember what 'isotope' means; a stunningly inventive, exceptionally funny, dangerously unsteady and (largely) coherent novel about sex, violence, space, time, and how the best way to deal with history is to ignore it. LET'S HOPE THE PARTY WAS WORTH IT

Mulholland Books

The Judas Factor

Ted Allbeury
Authors:
Ted Allbeury

Even in the murky world of espionage there are rules, understandings. Tad Anders has broken them. Too violent and too unpredictable, he let his feelings affect his ability to do his duty. The spymasters looked at his file, talked discreetly amongst themselves and quietly pensioned him off as too dangerous for regular use. But now the other side is breaking the rules: KGB-organised assassinations, the ruthless hunting down of defectors, kidnappings - in Vienna, Paris, Cologne and now London. A revenge operation is called for. An East Berlin abduction under the noses of the Russians, done by an agent who can be disowned if anything goes wrong... Tad Anders is needed again.

eBook now £2.99

Blind Alley by Danielle Ramsay

You can pick up Danielle Ramsay's heart-pounding Blind Alley in eBook for £2.99 at the retailers below. - Amazon Kindle - Kobo - Apple - Google Play

The Creeps Q&A with John Connolly

How long have you been frightening young people, and when did you decide to turn it from a hobby to a profession? Well, it’s not as if I’ve hanging around in alleyways dressed as a scarecrow, waiting for frailer children to walk by – not that that doesn’t sound like fun, mind you. I suppose I always enjoyed scary stories and films as a child and a teenager, although part of the pleasure always lay in laughing after the scare, I think. It’s what the current generation of torture porn auteurs doesn’t seem to realize, and it’s why, say, the 2013 remake of Evil Dead is so much more unpleasant than the original: it’s completely lacking in humor. In that sense, the Samuel Johnston books are really meant to be funny books that are a bit scary, rather than scary books that are a bit funny. The primary intention is to make the reader laugh. Why is it fun to be scared? Why do we look for scary things? It’s fun to be scared in safety, and at one remove from the threat, and not quite so much fun to be scared in actuality. That’s why parents are wrong to get too worked up about mildly scary films, and especially about mildly scary books. They’re a safe way for younger people to explore emotions, and a huge part of your development as a human being is exploring, and developing, one’s emotional makeup. They’re also a way of negotiating the darkness of the adult world, because they give form to threats and fears that are often very nebulous in reality. Children and teenagers understand that the adult world is difficult, and complex, and sometimes frightening, and supernatural fiction gives substance to the insubstantial. Look, the Twilight series is a good example. Those books aren’t about vampires and werewolves: they’re about relationships, and the difficulties of being in love, and finding oneself uprooted from one place to another when your parents’ marriage collapses. The vampire and werewolf stuff is just a carrier for those issues. Genre fiction is a good carrier food. What was the first scary book you read? I was very taken with a series of books for younger readers in which stories of supposedly real-life supernatural encounters were retold. I can’t recall who wrote them, but I liked the fact that they began with the assumption that this stuff might be real. That added an extra frisson. I was also reading Herbert Van Thal’s Pan anthologies, although they tended to have one or two good stories and then a whole bunch of ropier ones, many of which were age inappropriate. I’m on a roll now… I also had two anthologies of novelizations of Hammer horror movies, which I dearly loved, especially as I was rarely allowed to stay up late enough to watch Hammer movies on BBC 2 on Saturdays, so the novelizations were my generation’s equivalent of dodgy videos to watch behind the backs of parents. I then graduated to Stephen King, and MR James. What scared you when you were ten, and how was that different from what scares you now? I don’t think horror movies scared me. I can remember staying with a friend of mine at his parents’ holiday home, and being allowed to watch Dracula, Prince of Darkness because my parents weren’t around to say otherwise. I loved it, but my mate wet the bed during the night because of it. I felt slightly responsible for that, but only slightly. Later, I became concerned about my parents’ mortality, and a lot of that fed into The Book of Lost Things. Now, as I get older, I find myself still worried about my mother, who is in her eighties, but also becoming mildly concerned about my own mortality. Then again, maybe I’ll be the first to beat the odds. Why is Boswell a Dachshund, specifically? I always feel that they look like slightly worried, and vaguely thoughtful, little dogs. I suspect I have a natural empathy for them on that front. You’ve said this was the most difficult of the three Samuel Johnson books to write. Why was that? On one level it was because I was very anxious not to repeat myself, and I needed to find a way to make the book work after The Infernals/ Hell’s Bells. That was set in Hell, and so had a huge, mythic landscape against which to work. I couldn’t really improve upon that, so eventually it became clear that the way to go was to set the book in an enclosed space – in this case, a big old department store – but an enclosed space that also contained the entire Multiverse. But on another level it’s a book about leaving childhood behind. Samuel is getting older, and there’s a growing distance between himself and Nurd, the demon who lives with him, but it’s Nurd who recognizes it, not Samuel. There’s a little undercurrent of sadness to the book, so it was a question of balancing that alongside the humor, and the supernatural elements. Without giving too much away, THE CREEPS is rather clearly the end of a trilogy, but would you ever think about giving one of the secondary characters a book of his own — Nurd, perhaps, or Mr. Merryweather’s Elves? Follow-up question: do you have a favorite character, among Samuel’s infernal companions? The book does hint at that possibility, and they are characters to whom I hope to return. I love doing these little books. They’re an escape for me, and I’m fond of all of the characters. I suspect, though, that the next book, whenever I choose to write it, may well concern itself with Nurd. I even have a title in mind… Other than the main character being a young person, what’s the biggest difference between writing your adult books and writing the Samuel Johnson books? I think I can let my imagination run riot with the Samuel books, and I can also be funny – or try to be funny – in a way that I can’t in the adult books. I suppose, too, that I’m aware of trying to pass on information about the world, but not in a preachy way. There’s a kind of dual narrative in the books: there’s the main story being told, using one particular voice, and then there are occasional interjections, either as footnotes or asides, by another voice. It’s sometimes sarky, and kind of amused. I’ve always thought of it as the tone of the uncle in your family who always seemed a bit cooler than your dad. Will you continue to write books for young people, now that this trilogy is complete? Well, in the UK The Creeps is being published simultaneously with a book called Conquest, which is the first of a series for slightly older teens written with my better half, Jennie Ridyard. That’s a different way of writing about childhood, and I’m enjoying that challenge. It’s likely that there will be four of those books. In the end, I’ll always return to writing for young people. It’s incredibly rewarding – not financially, but spiritually and emotionally. I’m happier for doing it. What do you think about the categories of “young adult” and now “new adult” novels? Are these useful for readers, and do they/should they change the way authors write their books? I think they’re useful for bookstores in terms of organizing their shelves, and for parents and slightly younger readers who are still negotiating the world of books. From my own experience, though, I moved very quickly from books written for younger readers to adult books, and I was certainly exploring the world of adult fiction before I entered my teens. In the end, it’s a question of the development of the individual reader, and his or her tastes and maturity. I think, though, that adults have to learn to trust young readers. Kids, I find, are very good at discovering their own level when it comes to books. It can be a process of trial and error, but it’s a useful one. When it comes to books and reading, there’s a limit to how far wrong a kid can go! THE CREEPS by John Connolly is published in hardcover by Hodder & Stoughton on September 28 at £12.99

Teach Yourself

The Finance Coach: Teach Yourself

Lindsey Byrne
Authors:
Lindsey Byrne

This book guides readers simply through basic financial concepts, until they can understand and interpret published accounts to enable them to evaluate the performance of customers, competitors and suppliers. The book also focuses on management accounting, helping managers to compile budgets, control and manage costs, justify investment ideas and negotiate for funding and resources with their senior managers/the board and the finance department. By the end of this book each reader will feel confident: - managing their business area for improved financial performance - conversing financially with colleagues, bosses and finance professionals - setting and monitoring financial objectives and targets for their staff. Other books help you talk the talk. The Teach Yourself Coach books helps you walk the walk. Who are you? * Anyone who wants to impress more and achieve more with their written communication at work Where will this book take you? * You will have new skills and knowledge, and be fully ready to use it in a specific writing project How does it work? * A combination of practical tried-and-tested advice, and unique interactive exercises When can you do it? * In your own time, at your own pace What else do you get? * Access to free online videos and printable resources Why Teach Yourself®? * Teach Yourself books are trusted around the world and have helped sixty million people achieve their goals"

Teach Yourself

The Presenting Coach: Teach Yourself

Tricia Woolfrey
Authors:
Tricia Woolfrey

Most business books just tell you what to do. The Presenting Coach will guide you every step of the way. Understand what you need to achieve Plan out your presentation Prepare brilliant visual aids and handouts Deliver your presentation with confidence Make an impact at work Who are you? Anyone who has to give a presentation soon Where will this book take you? You will have a brilliant presentation and be ready to give it How does it work? The book uses the proven WORKBOOK METHOD, meaning it is packed with interactive exercises and self-assessment tools to help you reach your potential. What else do I get? The book includes access to a range of free downloadable templates and resources which will help you develop even further.

Teach Yourself

The Negotiation Coach: Teach Yourself

Peter Fleming
Authors:
Peter Fleming