Related to: 'Jo McMillan's Official Website'

Mulholland Books

A Map of the Dark

Karen Ellis
Authors:
Karen Ellis

A thrilling new FBI series for fans of Tess Gerritsen and Karin Slaughter. 'Compellingly told, with a striking sting in the tail' Daily Mail'Elsa is an unforgettable central character, damaged but determined . . . A perfect, deeply satisfying thriller that grips right to the end' Jane Casey, author of Let the Dead Speak********************** A girl missingA woman, searchingA killer, planning...If you're lost she'll find youBut who will save her?A thrilling new FBI series for fans of Tess Gerritsen and Karin Slaughter. Elsa Myers is smart, determined, and gifted with an extraordinary ability to find missing children. When vulnerable teenager Ruby disappears from Queens, she is put on the case.But Elsa's skills are rooted in her own troubled past. She is haunted by her mother's murder, her father is dying, and her relationship with her sister is crumbling. As the case begins to look hopeless, it becomes more and more personal, tangling with the traumatic history she has worked so hard to hide.As the darkness gathers around her, Elsa has to make a choice: can she save Ruby, if it means losing herself?

Hodder Paperbacks

Sons of the Blood

Robyn Young
Authors:
Robyn Young

'Robyn Young realistically evokes the brutal world of the late fifteenth century, and interweaves a gripping tale with a highly original take on Richard III and the Princes in the Tower. Provocative and grounded upon impressive research, this is historical fiction of a high calibre. More, please!' Alison Weir1483: A secret war is born...Jack Wynter is trapped in sun-baked Seville, sent there by his father with a locked box he's been told to guard with his life. A vital task, or just a ruse to get an illegitimate son out of the country?But, then, when his father is arrested for treason, Jack finds himself at the heart of a deadly conspiracy. Seeking answers to the mystery he has inherited, Jack returns to England, where his half-brother, Harry, broods bitterly over their father's apparent preference for a bastard son and young Prince Edward is due to become king... unless his uncle, Richard of Gloucester, makes a play for the throne. Jack Wynter is coming home, to a realm of danger, intrigue and war. Somehow, he is connected to a secret that stretches across Europe, and beyond. A secret with the power to kill him - or make him.Sons of the Blood is the first in an epic new series from the Sunday Times bestselling author. Look out for part two, Court of Wolves.

Two Roads

Can you hear me?

Elena Varvello
Authors:
Elena Varvello
Sceptre

Everyone Brave Is Forgiven

Chris Cleave
Authors:
Chris Cleave

'Ian McEwan did this with Atonement, Sarah Waters did it with The Night Watch, and Chris Cleave does it too with Everyone Brave is Forgiven... A compelling and finely crafted novel.' FT'An addictive, propulsive read' The Sunday TimesSummer Reading pick - Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the TrainTop Ten hottest summer reads - Sunday Telegraph Instant New York Times BestsellerEvening Standard bestseller'A cracker' Stylist, 10 Exciting Books in 2016'His best book to date' Esquire, 10 best novels of 2016 Guardian Literary Highlight of 2016Independent Best Book to read in 2016 Irish News Top Picks for 2016Washington Post 20 Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2016An extraordinary tale of love and honour in extreme circumstances, from the multi-award-winning author of THE OTHER HAND.When war is declared, Mary North leaves finishing school unfinished, goes straight to the War Office, and signs up.Tom Shaw decides to give it a miss - until his flatmate Alistair unexpectedly enlists, and the conflict can no longer be avoided.Young, bright and brave, Mary is certain she'd be a marvelous spy. When she is - bewilderingly - made a teacher, she instead finds herself defying prejudice to protect the children her country would rather forget. Tom, meanwhile, finds that he will do anything for Mary. And when Mary and Alistair meet, it is love, as well as war, that will test them in ways they could not have imagined, entangling three lives in violence and passion, friendship and deception, inexorably shaping their hopes and dreams.In a powerful combination of both humour and heartbreak, this dazzling novel weaves little-known history, and a perfect love story, through the vast sweep of the Second World War - daring us to understand that, against the great theatre of world events, it is the intimate losses, the small battles, the daily human triumphs, that change us most.

Hodder & Stoughton

Not in God's Name

Jonathan Sacks
Authors:
Jonathan Sacks
Two Roads

Church of Marvels

Leslie Parry
Authors:
Leslie Parry
Hodder Paperbacks

Sleeping Late on Judgement Day

Tad Williams
Authors:
Tad Williams

Bobby Dollar thinks he's seen it all - after all, he's been to Hell and back again. Literally.But he has another think coming. Sleeping Late on Judgement Day will find Bobby back in his adopted hometown of San Judas, California, trying to stay out of trouble... and failing. His love life is still a mess, there are one too many people who have it out for him, and drowning his sorrows in a nice glass of whisky won't keep the demons at bay forever. Bobby's going to have to pull himself together and make a few tough decisions before time runs out. The problem is, time could run out at any moment. In the final Bobby Dollar novel in Tad Williams' groundbreaking epic fantasy trilogy, fallen angel Bobby Dollar will finally be force to confront the one problem he can't talk his way out of: his own.

John Murray

Honeydew

Edith Pearlman
Authors:
Edith Pearlman

'The best short story writer in the world' Susan Hill, The TimesHoneydew is the first collection from Edith Pearlman since Binocular Vision, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and a 'spectacular literary revelation' (Sunday Times).Over the last few decades, Edith Pearlman has staked her claim as one of the great practitioners of the short story. Her understanding and skill have earned her comparisons to Anton Chekhov, John Updike and Alice Munro. Her latest work, gathered in this stunning collection of twenty new stories, is an occasion for celebration.The stories in Honeydew are unmistakably by Pearlman; whole lives in ten pages. They are minutely observant of people, of their foibles and failings, but also of their moments of kindness and truth. Whether the characters are Somalian women who've suffered circumcision, a special child with pentachromatic vision or a staid professor of Latin unsettled by a random invitation to lecture on the mystery of life and death, Pearlman knows each of them intimately and reveals them with generosity.

Two Roads

Love and Treasure

Ayelet Waldman
Authors:
Ayelet Waldman
Hodder & Stoughton

You Can Begin Again

Joyce Meyer
Authors:
Joyce Meyer
Chambers

The Chambers Thesaurus, 4th Edition

Chambers
Authors:
Chambers

In this book:'The Chambers Thesaurus is a veritable treasure-trove, including the greatest selection of alternative words and phrases available in an A to Z format. Modern vocabulary sits alongside archaic, and technical terms, formal language and slang are all covered.'This new, fourth edition contains 200 updated entries including the latest words entering the language. They reflect a range of social and technological changes: - From the digital world comes the growth of 'citizen journalism', the menace of the 'cyberbully' and the tricky rules of 'netiquette'. - The green agenda is explored through the evolution of recycling - 'precycle' and 'upcycle' - as well as the inclusion of 'organic' and 'e-waste'.- From the economic recession comes 'agflation', 'NEET', 'cash-strapped' and the increasingly popular 'daycation'.The Word Lover's Gallimaufry, a brand new 48-page section of curious and intriguing word lists, offers practical advice for anyone wanting to write, present or speak creatively. It also reflects the quirkiness and ever-evolving nature of English. Discover a range of fascinating and useful synonyms and expressions for our modern world:- Get the words to impress at an interview - 'champion' and 'skillset'.- Learn how to avoid annoying clichés - 'ultimately' not 'at the end of the day'.- Discover how to sound like a foodie or a fashionista - 'slow food' and 'fast fashion'.- Examine the rise of coffee culture - 'dead eye', 'flat white' and 'skinny'.- Understand modern phobias like 'email bankruptcy' and 'infomania'. - Explore the rise of Blinglish - 'bruv' and 'safe'.An ideal companion to The Chambers Dictionary, all lovers of language and its intricate evolution will find this new edition both compelling and indispensable

Hodder Paperbacks

Hot Blooded

Lisa Jackson
Authors:
Lisa Jackson

SHE HAS FORGOTTEN THE KILLER ... BUT THE KILLER WILL NEVER FORGET HERA gripping psychological thriller, from Number One bestselling author Lisa Jackson, for readers of Nora Roberts and Karen Rose.A prostitute lies strangled in a seedy French Quarter hotel. Popular late-night radio host Dr. Samantha Leeds receives a threatening phone call. Who would think to link the two? But when the ominous caller persists, along with a mysterious female claiming to be a woman from her past - a woman who's been dead for years - she turns to the police for help. Detective Rick Bentz is convinced that a serial killer is prowling the streets. New Orleans is beginning to be afraid ...

Hodder & Stoughton

Lost Souls

Lisa Jackson
Authors:
Lisa Jackson

EVIL STALKS NEW ORELANS ...A chilling psychological thriller from New York Times bestselling author Lisa Jackson. A must-read for fans of Nora Roberts and Karin Slaughter.The girls who disappeared were all 'lost souls', but Kristi Bentz - who has survived a serial killer twice - senses there's something that links them. She enrols at her old college, following the steps of the troubled girls. But All Saints University has changed. There are whispers of a secret society on campus whose members wear vials of blood around their necks. To find the truth, Kristi joins their inner circle ... but is she the hunter now, or the prey?

Hodder Paperbacks

Almost Dead

Lisa Jackson
Authors:
Lisa Jackson
Hodder & Stoughton

One Hundred Ways for a Cat to Find Its Inner Kitten

Celia Haddon
Authors:
Celia Haddon

Purrfect ways to understand the meaning of your inner kittenhood and humans, ­ the dysfunctional species that stifle your inner kitten joy.Finding your inner kitten is about finding serenity and peace. It's never too late, at any age, to have a happy kittenhood. The secret of this lies in your ability to integrate and transform your experiences with an inferior species, humans.Stop relying on humans to fulfill your physical, emotional and inner-kitten needs. You must take responsibility for your own welfare. Humans are emotionally inadequate. They cannot understand the purradigm of the cat-human partnership. Humans expect lifelong loyalty and love, failing to understand that this is the human part of the relationship. Their inevitable disappointment warps the relationship.Bowls of food are no substitute for proper hunting. The hard wired instinct to eye, stalk, pounce, tear off feathers and eat prey is unused and the inner kitten is unfulfilled.Catnip mice are no substitute for real mice. Humans enjoy playing with them. We cats do not recognise them as mice though we will occasionally join in this silly human game ­ out of sheer good manners. Don't miss Celia Haddon's new book, 100 Ways to Be More Like Your Cat, a guide on how to improve your life by learning from your cat.

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Leslie Charteris's The Saint Steps In

Peter Robinson's introduction for

‘Sanctity does have its rewards.’ Whenever I think of the Saint, I can’t help but remember those magical Saturday mornings of my adolescence. In the early sixties, one of the highlights of my week was a Saturday morning visit to Stringers Book Exchange, in the bustling Kirkgate Market in Leeds. I would wander down the aisles listening to the stall holders shouting out their sales pitches for housewares and bolts of cloth, assailed on all sides by the smells of slightly rotten fruit and vegetables, perhaps stopping to pick up the latest Record Song Book or Melody Maker at the news stand, then I would wander on past the glistening slabs of marbled red meat displayed on the butchers’ stalls, and finally get to Stringers, where box after box of paperback books lay spread out on the trestle tables. The system was simple: Whatever you bought, you could bring back when you had finished it and get half the price you paid for it against a new purchase. Even back then, I liked to hang on to most of the books I bought, so I don’t think I took full advantage of the exchange feature. I was usually on the lookout for anything exciting – horror stories, spy stories, science fiction and crime thrillers, mostly. One of my favourites was the Saint. My eagle eye was always scanning the stacks for the stick figure with the halo, and I’m quite certain that The Saint Steps In was among one of the many Leslie Charteris books I bought there and didn’t take back to exchange. For me, the Saint beats his countless competitors – the Toff, the Baron, Sexton Blake, Bulldog Drummond et al –hands down, and he has remained one of the most enduring and best loved figures in popular culture. I wish I still had my tattered old Saint paperback collection today, but after so many years and so many moves, covering two continents, it’s a wonder I have anything left from those days at all. But now, after so many years out of print, when they were available only in obscure omnibus editions, and practically impossible to find at even the most accommodating of second-handbook shops, it’s good to have the whole series coming back in handsome and accessible paperback editions. At last, the Saint receives his due. Many people will remember the TV series, starring Roger Moore, which aired from 1962 to 1969. Good as the series was, and terrific as Sir Roger was in the title role, which fit him far more comfortably than did James Bond, there remains a huge difference between the TV Saint and the character in the books. Though most of the early black and white episodes were based on Charteris’ stories, they were adapted by a number of different screen writers and, as happens in the world of TV, often ended up being changed beyond recognition. The later, colour episodes were almost all based on original scripts, and though the Saint remained elegantly roguish and debonair throughout, he lacked some of the rougher and more foolhardy edges his character demonstrated in the books. The Saint in the books is much more violent, for example. In The Saint Steps In, Simon Templar is quite happy to keep on beating a man to a pulp, and perhaps even to pour boiling water and nitric acid over his feet, to get information, but we are given to believe that he only does that to people he knows would do the same to him! And he swears like a trooper. Charteris never gives us the actual words, of course, but his description of the string of expletives Templar unleashes when he loses a suspect is unmistakable. There was definitely a whiff of the London underworld about Simon Templar when he first emerged in the late 1920s, along with that ‘faint hint of mockery behind his clear blue eyes,’ and it stays with him throughout the series, despite the veneer of civilisation and the expensive tastes. Though he is on the side of the law, he isn’t above bending it to suit his own particular sense of justice, and while he might have played Robin Hood on occasion, his lifestyle is certainly lavish, to say the least! Though television may capture some of the witty banter of Charteris’ dialogue, it cannot reproduce the energy and playfulness of his use of language in general. He clearly loved words, loved puns, alliteration and metaphors, and his books are peppered with them. A lunch at the Grand Central Station Oyster Bar, for example, becomes, ‘He was driven by pangs of purely prosaic hunger to the Oyster Bar, where he took his time over the massacre of several inoffensive molluscs.’ As teenagers, we used to repeat these phrases to one another, and they never failed to provoke howls of laughter. Leslie Charteris moved to the USA in 1932. His first book to be set there was The Saint in New York (1935), which was followed by a number of European adventures before he returned to the USA for The Saint in Miami (1940), then The Saint Goes West (1942), which immediately precedes The Saint Steps In, which finds him moving between Washington DC, New York and Stamford, Connecticut. The book was originally serialised in Liberty Magazine in 1942, and published in volume form a year later by Hodder in the UK. The plot, such as it is, wouldn’t be out of place in an Alfred Hitchcock movie: North by Northwest, for example. A beautiful but straitlaced and enigmatic young woman called Madeline Gray comes to ask for Simon Templar’s help when she receives a threatening note. It appears that her father has invented a form of synthetic rubber that would be useful for the war effort – not to mention immensely profitable to whoever possesses it after the war – and she wants to make sure it ends up in the right hands. The formula becomes what Hitchcock called the ‘McGuffin,’ the highly sought after documents or plans that set the events of the plot in motion. Everybody wants them, but we don’t always know why, or even what they are. Soon, Templar gets a threatening note too, and then there is a scuffle in the street when it appears that someone is trying to abduct Madeline. When Templar and Madeline get to Stamford, they find that her father is missing, and then the plot thickens . . . In contrast to Madeline Gray, we also meet the rather less wholesome Andrea Quennel, who has ‘the build and beauty and colouring that Wagner was probably dreaming of before the divas took over.’ Charteris clearly enjoyed writing his descriptions of Andrea, especially her clothes, and this is where he gets to show off his love of metaphor to best advantage. ‘She wore a soft creamy sweater that clung like suds to every curve of her upper sculpture, and her lips were full and inviting.’ Charteris also has an eye for the nuances. Later in the book, Andrea wears a kind of dress that ‘would get by anywhere between a ballroom and a boudoir and still always have a faint air of belonging somewhere else.’ Throughout the book, Andrea offers the Saint anything he wants, and Madeline withholds herself. By the time of the events recounted in The Saint Steps In (1943), Simon Templar is ruing the fact that he is now far more widely known than he used to be. This he blames on the war. Instead of donning a military uniform in order to serve the Allies against the Axis powers, he has so far worked mostly behind the scenes, and has had to forge working relationships with government departments and security agencies he would once have shied away from. His new-found fame doesn’t seem to do him much harm, although he laments being ‘almost legal,’ as he still manages to carry on much as he likes. The only difference is that now he does it with the cooperation of the authorities. In The Saint Steps In, he even works with the F.B.I. How ironic Inspector Teal would find that! The presence of the war permeates The Saint Steps In, even from a distance, holding it together and providing some of its more serious moments, as when Templar contrasts the peace and beauty of New England with the distant horrors of war, the slaughter going on in Europe and the Far East. As he puts it, with characteristic understatement, ‘all that the paranoia of an unsuccessful house-painter was trying to destroy.’ Templar also becomes quite eloquent in an argument towards the end of the book, when he argues that most Americans only perceive the war as a distant event that doesn’t impinge too much on their daily lives because they haven’t felt its effects at first hand, as London did in the blitz. One wonders here where Charteris’ voice ends and Templar’s begins. Like most of the Saint stories, The Saint Steps In is a novel of adventure, mixing mystery and suspense with a fair amount of action and snappy dialogue in the vein of Raymond Chandler, whose The Lady in the Lake came out the same year. Also around the same time, RKO Pictures had more or less plagiarised the Saint for the movies and rechristened him the Falcon, with George Sanders (an ex-movie Saint) in the title role. Oddly enough, the third Falcon film, The Falcon Takes Over (1942), was based on Chandler’s Farewell, My Lovely – so, in a strange way, the Saint became Philip Marlowe, however briefly! Unlike Marlowe, though, Simon Templar doesn’t have the dubious respectability of a private detective’s licence; he does, however, have the same sense of himself as an adventurer, a sort of knight errant, as a man who, in Chandler’s words, is ‘a man of honor, by instinct, by inevitability, without thought of it, and certainly without saying it . . . The best man in his world and a good enough man for any world.’ He is, after all, the Saint.

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Chapter One

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, by John le Carré

Read the first chapter of John le Carré's acclaimed TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, now a major film.