Related to: 'Co-Active Coaching'

Hodder & Stoughton

Four

Andy Jones
Authors:
Andy Jones
John Murray Learning

Insider's French: Intermediate Conversation Course (Learn French with the Michel Thomas Method)

Akshay Bakaya
Authors:
Akshay Bakaya

Do you want to be able to express yourself in French with confidence and fluency?Insider's French offers a genuine perspective on Francophone culture, opinions and language use so that you can speak confidently on topical issues that are key to the French speaker today.This intermediate French conversation course, devised for all intermediate-level learners or those following on from Total or Perfect French, will advance your overall fluency, listening comprehension and conversation skills, expand your vocabulary and improve your grammar. Through authentic, lively conversations around engaging topics, and the unique Michel Thomas Method for learning, this course focuses on the colloquial language and conversation strategies used by native French speakers so that you can fit in and communicate more naturally.Michel Thomas, the preeminent language teacher, always said that learners start by mastering basic linguist structures (as in his Total and Perfect courses), which provide the bare walls of the house, but that that it was up to us, the learner, to decorate it in our own personal way. Insider's French reflects Michel Thomas' 'Phase 2' courses that he and his team offered at his New York language school, allowing increased vocabulary, improved speaking, comprehension and reading and writing skills - the tools with which to decorate their houses.Insider's French includes:· Twenty authentic conversations around a comprehensive range of subjects that reflect contemporary French culture· Language plus: conversation strategies, pronunciation and intonation to help learners express themselves naturally· Listening and speaking practice to help learners progress to the next level· Cultural insights into the unspoken rules of the language This ebook includes 10 chapters with integrated audio conversations. Why is the Michel Thomas Method so successful?The Michel Thomas Method draws on the principles of instructional psychology. Knowledge is structured and organised for the student so that you assimilate the language easily and don't forget it. The method deconstructs the language into building blocks that are introduced sequentially in such a way that the learner creates his/her response and moves on to ever-more-complex sentences. Michel said: I will dissect everything into small parts and reassemble it in such a way that one will understand everything step by step.He was also very clear about his ground rules: no memorisation, no drills, no homework; relax and leave off the anxiety normally associated with language learning.

John Murray

Four Princes

John Julius Norwich
Authors:
John Julius Norwich

'Never before had the world seen four such giants co-existing. Sometimes friends, more often enemies, always rivals, these four men together held Europe in the hollow of their hands.' Four great princes - Henry VIII of England, Francis I of France, Charles V of Spain and Suleiman the Magnificent - were born within a single decade. Each looms large in his country's history and, in this book, John Julius Norwich broadens the scope and shows how, against the rich background of the Renaissance and destruction of the Reformation, their wary obsession with one another laid the foundations for modern Europe. Individually, each man could hardly have been more different ­- from the scandals of Henry's six wives to Charles's monasticism - but, together, they dominated the world stage. From the Field of the Cloth of Gold, a pageant of jousting, feasting and general carousing so lavish that it nearly bankrupted both France and England, to Suleiman's celebratory pyramid of 2,000 human heads (including those of seven Hungarian bishops) after the battle of Mohács; from Anne Boleyn's six-fingered hand (a potential sign of witchcraft) that had the pious nervously crossing themselves to the real story of the Maltese falcon, Four Princes is history at its vivid, entertaining best. With a cast list that extends from Leonardo da Vinci to Barbarossa, and from Joanna the Mad to le roi grand-nez, John Julius Norwich offers the perfect guide to the most colourful century the world has ever known and brings the past to unforgettable life.

Hodder & Stoughton

Dear Michael, Love Dad

Iain Maitland
Authors:
Iain Maitland

'wonderful, moving, humorous ... extremely poignant' Charlie Mortimer, Dear Lupin'...by turns acidly funny, exasperating and poignant, painting a moving portrait both of mental illness and of a father in denial. But paternal love... shines through.' Caroline Sanderson, Sunday ExpressLetters, Laughter and all the things we leave unsaid...Dear Michael,Moving your whatnots et al into the flat has put paid to any improvements in my back. Still, at least it's done now.Your mother is already worrying how you'll cope and is at work on reams of notes on all sorts of matters from how to tell if meat has gone off to washing whites. Smell it and wear black is my advice. Please do try to master the can opener and other basics before calling. You know how she worries.When Iain Maitland's eldest son left home for university he wrote regularly to him; funny, curmudgeonly letters chronicling their family life and giving Michael unsolicited and hopeless advice on everything from DIY to women. He never expected a reply - they were simply his way of continuing their relationship. What Iain didn't realise was that away from home his beloved boy was suffering from depression and anorexia. Only much later did it become apparent to Iain and his wife just how oblivious they had been, and for how very long.Told through Iain's letters and the unfolding reality of Michael's situation, Dear Michael, Love Dad forces us to question how well we can ever truly know our loved ones, but most of all expresses the unbreakable bond between a father and son.

Sceptre

Stork Mountain

Miroslav Penkov
Authors:
Miroslav Penkov

In his mesmerising first novel, the internationally celebrated short-story writer Miroslav Penkov spins the intriguing tale of an American student who returns to Bulgaria, the country he left as a child. His mission is to track down his grandfather and to find out why he suddenly cut off all contact with the family three years before.The trail leads him to a remote village on the border with Turkey, a stone's throw away from Greece, high up in the Strandja Mountains - a place of pagan mysteries and black storks nesting in giant oaks; a place where every spring, possessed by Christian saints, men and women dance barefoot across live coals in search of rebirth. Here in the mountains, he is drawn by his grandfather into a maze of half-truths. And here, he falls in love with an unobtainable Muslim girl. Old ghosts come back to life and forgotten conflicts blaze anew, until the past finally yields up its plangent secrets.

Hodder Paperbacks

Mr Mercedes

Stephen King
Authors:
Stephen King

Described as 'the best thriller of the year' Sunday Express, the No. 1 bestseller introduces retired cop Bill Hodges in a race against time to apprehend a killer.A cat-and-mouse suspense thriller featuring Bill Hodges, a retired cop who is tormented by 'the Mercedes massacre', a case he never solved.Brady Hartsfield, perpetrator of that notorious crime, has sent Hodges a taunting letter. Now he's preparing to kill again.Each starts to close in on the other in a mega-stakes race against time.

Hodder & Stoughton

She Landed By Moonlight

Carole Seymour-Jones
Authors:
Carole Seymour-Jones

On the night of the 22 September 1943 Pearl Witherington, a twenty-nine-year-old British secretary and agent of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), was parachuted from a Halifax bomber into Occupied France. Like Sebastian Faulks' heroine, Charlotte Gray, Pearl had a dual mission: to fight for her beloved, broken France and to find her lost love. Pearl's lover was a Parisian parfumier turned soldier, Henri Cornioley, who had been taken prisoner while serving in the French Logistics Corps and subsequently escaped from his German POW camp. Agent Pearl Witherington's wartime record is unique and heroic. As the only woman agent in the history of SOEs in France to have run a network, she became a fearless and legendary guerrilla leader organising, arming and training 3,800 Resistance fighters. Probably the greatest female organiser of armed maquisards in France, the woman whom her young troops called 'Ma Mère', Pearl lit the fires of Resistance in Central France so that Churchill's famous order to 'set Europe ablaze', which had brought SOE into being, finally came to pass. Pearl's story takes us from her harsh, impoverished childhood in Paris, to the lonely forests and farmhouses of the Loir-et-Cher where she would become a true 'warrior queen'. Shortly before Pearl's death in 2008, the Queen presented her with a CBE in Paris. While male agents and Special Force Jedburghs received the DSO or Military Cross, an ungrateful country had forgotten Pearl. She had been offered a civilian decoration in 1945 which she refused, saying 'There was nothing civil about what I did.' But what pleased her most was to receive her Parachute Wings, for which she had waited over 60 years. Two RAF officers travelled to her old people's home and she was finally able to pin the coveted wings on her lapel. Pearl died in February 2008 aged 93.

John Murray

Ballad of the Whiskey Robber

Julian Rubinstein
Authors:
Julian Rubinstein

What do you get when you add together a bottle of whiskey, a bad gambler, a flea-market wig, a plastic gun and a Hungarian bank? $5,900. And what do you get twenty-nine of these robberies later? The legend of the Whiskey Robber. When the Eastern bloc thawed, some extraordinary stories were revealed. But none is as entertaining as this. Attila Ambrus escaped late-eighties Romania for Hungary - but soon found that living on his wits wasn't getting him very far. Becoming goalie for a third-division ice hockey team brought no fortune and little glory, and his procession of moneymaking ruses fared little better - until he discovered robbery. With a supporting cast of car-wash owners, exotic dancers, drunk army generals and cocaine-snorting Hungarian rappers, Julian Rubinstein's tale is a spectacular debut, immortalizing the most charming outlaw since the Sundance Kid.

Hodder & Stoughton

Before the Poison

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Co-Active Coaching

Henry Kimsey-House, Karen Kimsey-House, Phillip Sandahl, Laura Whitworth
Authors:
Henry Kimsey-House, Karen Kimsey-House, Phillip Sandahl, Laura Whitworth

'The bible of coaching guides' -Stephen R Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective PeopleTHE BOOK THAT CHANGED THE COACHING FIELD FOREVERUsed as the definitive resource in dozens of professional development programs, Co-Active Coaching teaches the transformative communication process that allows individuals from all levels of an organization - from students to teachers, and direct reports to managers - to build strong, collaborative relationships.With the first edition, the authors of Co-Active Coaching earned their place at the forefront of the coaching profession. Now, this fully revised third edition of their classic work extends the use of their pioneering Co-Active model - which emphasizes a partnership between client and coach - into leadership management throughout an organization. This new edition has been updates to include fresh coaching examples, the latest in coaching terminology and an expanded, web-based 'Coach's Toolkit'.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Flourish

Martin Seligman
Authors:
Martin Seligman

'Admirable and exciting' -Sunday Times'His most personal and boldest book so far' -Nature'This book will help you flourish.' With this promise, internationally esteemed psychologist Martin Seligman begins Flourish, the first book to present his dynamic new concept of what well-being really is. Traditionally, the goal of psychology has been to relieve human suffering, but the goal of the Positive Psychology movement, which Dr Seligman has led for 15 years, is different - it's about actually raising the bar for the human condition. Flourish builds on Dr Seligman's game-changing work on optimism, motivation and character to show how to get the most out of life.

Sceptre

Remembering the Bones

Frances Itani
Authors:
Frances Itani

Georgina Danforth Witley has never felt she has led anything but an ordinary life. But here she is on her way to meet the Queen. Born on April 21, 1926, the exact same day as Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, Georgie is one of 99 privileged Commonwealth subjects invited to an 80th-birthday lunch at Buckingham Palace. All she has to do is drive two hours to the airport and board the plane for London. Except that in her excited state, Georgie drives her car off the road, tumbling into a thickly wooded ravine. Thrown from the car, injured and unable to move but desperately hopeful that someone will find her, she must rely on her strength, her full store of family memories, her no-nonsense wit and a recitation of the names of the bones in her bodya long-forgotten exercise from childhood that reminds her she is still very much alive.

Sceptre

The Centre of the Bed

Joan Bakewell
Authors:
Joan Bakewell

The story of Joan Bakewell's life and times spans the Blitz in Manchester, Cambridge during the glittering era of Michael Frayn, Peter Hall, Jonathan Miller et al, London at its most exciting in the swinging sixties and the world of the media and the arts from the 60s to the present. As she reflects on the choices she has made and the influences that shaped her, she confronts painful childhood memories of her mother's behaviour and describes both her affair with Harold Pinter and her two marriages with remarkable honesty. Throughout she uses her own experience to explore the extraordinary change in women's roles during her lifetime. This is no ordinary celebrity autobiography but a memoir that is beautifully written, frank and absorbing, which draws a thought-provoking portrait of Britain in the last 70 years.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook

Art Kleiner, Bryan Smith, Charlotte Roberts, Peter M. Senge, Richard Ross
Authors:
Art Kleiner, Bryan Smith, Charlotte Roberts, Peter M. Senge, Richard Ross

This book is for people who want to learn, especially while treading the fertile ground of organizational life. The idea of a learning organization has become increasingly prominent over the last few years. This book's predecessor, The Fifth Discipline, helped give voice to that wave on interest by presenting the conceptual underpinnings of the work of building learning organizations. Since its publication in 1990, Peter Senge et al. have talked to thousands of people who have committed themselves to the idea of building a learning organization. However, many of them are still not certain how to put the concepts into practice, asking questions like 'What do we do Monday morning? How do we navigate past the many barriers and roadblocks to collective learning? How do we discover exactly what kind of learning organization we wish to create? How do we get started?' No one person has THE answers to these questions, but there are answers. It is time for a 'fieldbook' - a collection of notes, reflections and exercised 'from the field'. This volume contains 172 pieces of writing by 67 authors, describing tools and methods, stories and reflections, guiding ideas and exercises and resources which people are using effectively.

Henry Kimsey-House

Henry Kimsey-House is one of the first professional coaches in the field. He is the cofounder and lead designer of the provocative, experiential training programs of The Coaches Training Institute (CTI).

Karen Kimsey-House

Karen Kimsey-House is the cofounder and CEO of The Coaches Training Institute and among the earliest recognised luminaries in the coaching profession. She founded CTI in 1992 with Laura Whitworth and Henry Kimsey-House. Together they created the Co-Active philosophy of relationships that informs CTI's world-renowned coaching and leadership programs.

Laura Whitworth

Laura Whitworth was the creator of the Co-Active Model with Henry Kimsey-House and Karen Kimsey-House and a recognised leader in the development of the coaching profession.

Leslie Charteris's The Saint Steps In

Peter Robinson's introduction for

‘Sanctity does have its rewards.’ Whenever I think of the Saint, I can’t help but remember those magical Saturday mornings of my adolescence. In the early sixties, one of the highlights of my week was a Saturday morning visit to Stringers Book Exchange, in the bustling Kirkgate Market in Leeds. I would wander down the aisles listening to the stall holders shouting out their sales pitches for housewares and bolts of cloth, assailed on all sides by the smells of slightly rotten fruit and vegetables, perhaps stopping to pick up the latest Record Song Book or Melody Maker at the news stand, then I would wander on past the glistening slabs of marbled red meat displayed on the butchers’ stalls, and finally get to Stringers, where box after box of paperback books lay spread out on the trestle tables. The system was simple: Whatever you bought, you could bring back when you had finished it and get half the price you paid for it against a new purchase. Even back then, I liked to hang on to most of the books I bought, so I don’t think I took full advantage of the exchange feature. I was usually on the lookout for anything exciting – horror stories, spy stories, science fiction and crime thrillers, mostly. One of my favourites was the Saint. My eagle eye was always scanning the stacks for the stick figure with the halo, and I’m quite certain that The Saint Steps In was among one of the many Leslie Charteris books I bought there and didn’t take back to exchange. For me, the Saint beats his countless competitors – the Toff, the Baron, Sexton Blake, Bulldog Drummond et al –hands down, and he has remained one of the most enduring and best loved figures in popular culture. I wish I still had my tattered old Saint paperback collection today, but after so many years and so many moves, covering two continents, it’s a wonder I have anything left from those days at all. But now, after so many years out of print, when they were available only in obscure omnibus editions, and practically impossible to find at even the most accommodating of second-handbook shops, it’s good to have the whole series coming back in handsome and accessible paperback editions. At last, the Saint receives his due. Many people will remember the TV series, starring Roger Moore, which aired from 1962 to 1969. Good as the series was, and terrific as Sir Roger was in the title role, which fit him far more comfortably than did James Bond, there remains a huge difference between the TV Saint and the character in the books. Though most of the early black and white episodes were based on Charteris’ stories, they were adapted by a number of different screen writers and, as happens in the world of TV, often ended up being changed beyond recognition. The later, colour episodes were almost all based on original scripts, and though the Saint remained elegantly roguish and debonair throughout, he lacked some of the rougher and more foolhardy edges his character demonstrated in the books. The Saint in the books is much more violent, for example. In The Saint Steps In, Simon Templar is quite happy to keep on beating a man to a pulp, and perhaps even to pour boiling water and nitric acid over his feet, to get information, but we are given to believe that he only does that to people he knows would do the same to him! And he swears like a trooper. Charteris never gives us the actual words, of course, but his description of the string of expletives Templar unleashes when he loses a suspect is unmistakable. There was definitely a whiff of the London underworld about Simon Templar when he first emerged in the late 1920s, along with that ‘faint hint of mockery behind his clear blue eyes,’ and it stays with him throughout the series, despite the veneer of civilisation and the expensive tastes. Though he is on the side of the law, he isn’t above bending it to suit his own particular sense of justice, and while he might have played Robin Hood on occasion, his lifestyle is certainly lavish, to say the least! Though television may capture some of the witty banter of Charteris’ dialogue, it cannot reproduce the energy and playfulness of his use of language in general. He clearly loved words, loved puns, alliteration and metaphors, and his books are peppered with them. A lunch at the Grand Central Station Oyster Bar, for example, becomes, ‘He was driven by pangs of purely prosaic hunger to the Oyster Bar, where he took his time over the massacre of several inoffensive molluscs.’ As teenagers, we used to repeat these phrases to one another, and they never failed to provoke howls of laughter. Leslie Charteris moved to the USA in 1932. His first book to be set there was The Saint in New York (1935), which was followed by a number of European adventures before he returned to the USA for The Saint in Miami (1940), then The Saint Goes West (1942), which immediately precedes The Saint Steps In, which finds him moving between Washington DC, New York and Stamford, Connecticut. The book was originally serialised in Liberty Magazine in 1942, and published in volume form a year later by Hodder in the UK. The plot, such as it is, wouldn’t be out of place in an Alfred Hitchcock movie: North by Northwest, for example. A beautiful but straitlaced and enigmatic young woman called Madeline Gray comes to ask for Simon Templar’s help when she receives a threatening note. It appears that her father has invented a form of synthetic rubber that would be useful for the war effort – not to mention immensely profitable to whoever possesses it after the war – and she wants to make sure it ends up in the right hands. The formula becomes what Hitchcock called the ‘McGuffin,’ the highly sought after documents or plans that set the events of the plot in motion. Everybody wants them, but we don’t always know why, or even what they are. Soon, Templar gets a threatening note too, and then there is a scuffle in the street when it appears that someone is trying to abduct Madeline. When Templar and Madeline get to Stamford, they find that her father is missing, and then the plot thickens . . . In contrast to Madeline Gray, we also meet the rather less wholesome Andrea Quennel, who has ‘the build and beauty and colouring that Wagner was probably dreaming of before the divas took over.’ Charteris clearly enjoyed writing his descriptions of Andrea, especially her clothes, and this is where he gets to show off his love of metaphor to best advantage. ‘She wore a soft creamy sweater that clung like suds to every curve of her upper sculpture, and her lips were full and inviting.’ Charteris also has an eye for the nuances. Later in the book, Andrea wears a kind of dress that ‘would get by anywhere between a ballroom and a boudoir and still always have a faint air of belonging somewhere else.’ Throughout the book, Andrea offers the Saint anything he wants, and Madeline withholds herself. By the time of the events recounted in The Saint Steps In (1943), Simon Templar is ruing the fact that he is now far more widely known than he used to be. This he blames on the war. Instead of donning a military uniform in order to serve the Allies against the Axis powers, he has so far worked mostly behind the scenes, and has had to forge working relationships with government departments and security agencies he would once have shied away from. His new-found fame doesn’t seem to do him much harm, although he laments being ‘almost legal,’ as he still manages to carry on much as he likes. The only difference is that now he does it with the cooperation of the authorities. In The Saint Steps In, he even works with the F.B.I. How ironic Inspector Teal would find that! The presence of the war permeates The Saint Steps In, even from a distance, holding it together and providing some of its more serious moments, as when Templar contrasts the peace and beauty of New England with the distant horrors of war, the slaughter going on in Europe and the Far East. As he puts it, with characteristic understatement, ‘all that the paranoia of an unsuccessful house-painter was trying to destroy.’ Templar also becomes quite eloquent in an argument towards the end of the book, when he argues that most Americans only perceive the war as a distant event that doesn’t impinge too much on their daily lives because they haven’t felt its effects at first hand, as London did in the blitz. One wonders here where Charteris’ voice ends and Templar’s begins. Like most of the Saint stories, The Saint Steps In is a novel of adventure, mixing mystery and suspense with a fair amount of action and snappy dialogue in the vein of Raymond Chandler, whose The Lady in the Lake came out the same year. Also around the same time, RKO Pictures had more or less plagiarised the Saint for the movies and rechristened him the Falcon, with George Sanders (an ex-movie Saint) in the title role. Oddly enough, the third Falcon film, The Falcon Takes Over (1942), was based on Chandler’s Farewell, My Lovely – so, in a strange way, the Saint became Philip Marlowe, however briefly! Unlike Marlowe, though, Simon Templar doesn’t have the dubious respectability of a private detective’s licence; he does, however, have the same sense of himself as an adventurer, a sort of knight errant, as a man who, in Chandler’s words, is ‘a man of honor, by instinct, by inevitability, without thought of it, and certainly without saying it . . . The best man in his world and a good enough man for any world.’ He is, after all, the Saint.

An excerpt from the Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

CLOUD ATLAS, by David Mitchell

Read an excerpt of David Mitchell's international bestseller, CLOUD ATLAS, now also releasing as a film.

Chapter One: The House of Punk Sleep

WIDE AWAKE, by Patricia Morrisroe

Read an excerpt of the first chapter of Patricia Morrisroe's brilliant memoir about insomnia, WIDE AWAKE.