Related to: 'Journeys to the Other Side of the World'

John Murray

The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt

Andrea Wulf, Lilian Melcher
Authors:
Andrea Wulf, Lilian Melcher
Two Roads

Journeys to the Other Side of the World

David Attenborough
Authors:
David Attenborough

'Abundantly good' TLS'With charm, erudition, humour and passion, the world's favourite natural history broadcaster documents some of his expeditions from the late 1950s onwards' Sunday Express'A wondrous reminder of Attenborough's pioneering role . . . full of delightful tales' Daily Express'An adventure that sparked a lifetime's commitment to the planet' The Lady'Attenborough is a fine writer and storyteller' Irish TimesFollowing the success of the original Zoo Quest expeditions, in the late 1950s onwards the young David Attenborough embarked on further travels in a very different part of the world.From Madagascar and New Guinea to the Pacific Islands and the Northern Territory of Australia, he and his cameraman companion were aiming to record not just the wildlife, but the way of life of some of the indigenous people of these regions, whose traditions had never been encountered by most of the British public before.From the land divers of Pentecost Island and the sing-sings of New Guinea, to a Royal Kava ceremony on Tonga and the ancient art of the Northern Territory, it is a journey like no other. Alongside these remarkable cultures he encounters paradise birds, chameleons, sifakas and many more animals in some of the most unique environments on the planet.Written with David Attenborough's characteristic charm, humour and warmth, Journeys to the Other Side of the World is an inimitable adventure among people, places and the wildest of wildlife.

Two Roads

Adventures of a Young Naturalist

David Attenborough
Authors:
David Attenborough
John Murray

How to Be Human

Chambers

The Odditorium

David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley
Authors:
David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley

'I LOVE THE BOOK... A BRILLIANT READ' Chris Evans, Radio 2 Breakfast ShowALSO OUT NOW: THE MYSTERIUM, the must-have follow-up to The Odditorium'This book, that I approached with caution, turns out to be magnificent. Tested it with the Moondog entry. Passed A+' Danny Baker, Radio 5LiveA CELEBRATION OF CURIOSITY AND OBSESSIONStep into a world of gloriously unpredictable characters such as Ivor Cutler, Quentin Crisp, Joe Orton, Reginald Bray, Ken Campbell, Screaming Lord Sutch, Sun Ra, Buckminster Fuller, Timothy Leary and Ayn Rand.The Odditorium is a playful re-telling of history, told not through the lens of its victors, but through the fascinating stories of a wealth of individuals who, while lesser-known, are no less remarkable.Throughout its pages you'll learn about the antics and adventures of tricksters, eccentrics, deviants and inventors. While their stories range from heroic failures to great hoaxes, one thing unites them - they all carved their own path through life. Each protagonist exemplifies the human spirit through their dogged determination, willingness to take risks, their unflinching obsession and, often, a good dollop of eccentricity.Learn about Reginald Bray (1879-1939), a Victorian accountant who sent over 30,000 singular objects through the mail, including himself; Muriel Howorth (1886-1971), the housewife who grew giant peanuts using atomic energy; and Elaine Morgan (1920-2013), a journalist who battled a tirade of prejudice to pursue an aquatic-based theory of human evolution, which is today being championed by David Attenborough. While many of us are content to lead a conventional life, with all of its comfort and security, The Odditorium reminds us of the characters who felt compelled to carve their own path, despite risking ostracism, failure, ridicule and madness. Outsider artists, linguists, scientists, time travellers and architects all feature in The Odditorium, each of whom risked ostracism, ridicule and even madness in pursuit of carving their own esoteric path, changing the world in wonderful ways.'BRAMWELL CLEARLY HAS AN EYE FOR THE ODDBALL AND ARCANE' The Guardian

John Murray

Natural Histories

Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
Authors:
Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss

Prepare to dive to the depths of the sea with 100-foot-long giant squid, travel through space after the meteorites shooting into our atmosphere and join a dangerous expedition to Antarctica to find the Emperor Penguin egg. Discover fleas dressed by nuns, a defeated prince hiding from his enemies in an oak tree and the plant whose legendary screams could drive you mad . . .Accompanying Radio 4's acclaimed six-month series with the Natural History Museum, Natural Histories tells the riveting stories of how our relationships with twenty-five unexpected creatures have permanently changed the way we see the world. Packed full of fascinating science, history and folklore, this beautiful book brings you face to face with nature, in all its wonder, complexity and invention.Fresh from winning the Thomson Reuters prize for Tweet of the Day, Brett Westwood and Stephen Moss have written another imaginative and inspiring book. Each chapter explores a different species or phenomena, often taking a fascinating object in the museum's collection as a starting point. From rock pools and blackberry picking to a shipwreck thousands of miles from land; and from David Attenborough on gorillas to Monty Python on dinosaurs, this is a book for anyone curious about the world we live in. You'll never take nature for granted again.

Coronet

Breaking the Silence

Jo Milne
Authors:
Jo Milne
Hodder & Stoughton

Shetland Diaries

Simon King
Authors:
Simon King
Hodder & Stoughton

Parky's People

Michael Parkinson
Authors:
Michael Parkinson

A unique memoir by Sir Michael Parkinson, reflecting on 100 of the most legendary encounters by the man who has met everyone who is someone.Sir Michael Parkinson occupies a unique place in the public consciousness. For many he is the chronicler of a generation. Through his onscreen work and his intelligent, thought provking journalism, he has introduced millions of people to the major names of sport of showbiz over the past five decades. In Parky's People, Parkinson gives us an intimate insight into the lives of great celebrities from all around the world. Now an international celebrity himself, the man from a humble but colourful Yorkshire mining family who can tease out the secrets of even the most reticent star guest. Those featured include Muhammad Ali, David Attenborough, Judi Dench, David Beckham, and many, many more. Parkinson's distinguished career has involved working on highly acclaimed current affairs and film programmes. His wide interests and expertise include jazz, film, football and cricket. Witty and humourous, Parky's People makes the perfect gift.

Hodder & Stoughton

Northern Wilderness

Ray Mears
Authors:
Ray Mears

Northern Wilderness is a stunning celebration of one of earth's great wildernesses. Ray Mears journeys on foot, by canoe and by snowshoe through mountains, forests, tundra and ice in a land where roads are still scarce. He explores the vast Boreal Forest and its rich animal life, and travels across the Hudson Bay by canoe, telling the story of the fur trappers who traded with the hat manufacturers of England. Ray follows the paths of the great early northern explorers, Samuel Hearne and David Thompson, who survived through their knowledge of what we now call bushcraft, as they trekked across the tundra and the Rocky Mountains. He explores the frozen north and learns the ways of the Inuit, who teach him how to combat snow blindness and build shelter. This book is rich in bushcraft, as Ray explains the unique survival techniques of the Native Canadians and the Inuit, as well as how the prospectors in the gold rush used bushcraft skills to survive in this inhospitable but awesome landscape.

Hodder & Stoughton

Wild Life

Simon King
Authors:
Simon King

Even as a young child, Simon King was passionate about the natural world. Expressed in a variety of ways, from keeping faintly rotting animal parts in his underwear drawer (as a 10-year-old), to making several hundred films about wildlife, his enduring interest in all things wild and free has been a way of, rather than a part of his life. Being savaged by a rabid cheetah, charged at by rhinos and elephants and defecated upon by a long list of birds and other animals may sound like hell to some. But these, along with countless other experiences alongside all things furry, scaly, slimy and feathery have provided him with an enormously rich bank of tales to relive and retell. With his professional life starting aged ten, acting in a television drama called The Fox, (for which he looked after an orphaned fox for two years at home), through projects such as Planet Earth, Blue Planet, Springwatch, Autumnwatch and Big Cat Diary to name just a few, Simon King has travelled to every continent and lived in extreme conditions from remote desert to Arctic and Antarctic wilderness. With characteristic honesty and charm, Simon King weaves his animal stories amongst encounters with extraordinary people and astonishing places to give us a memoir that will delight readers.

Hodder Paperbacks

A Bridge Too Far

Cornelius Ryan
Authors:
Cornelius Ryan

The true story of the greatest battle of World War II and the basis of the 1977 film of the same name, directed by Richard Attenborough.The Battle of Arnhem, one of the most dramatic battles of World War II, was as daring as it was ill-fated. It cost the Allies nearly twice as many casualties as D-Day. This is the whole compelling story, told through the vast cast of characters involved. From Dutch civilians to British and American strategists, its scope and ambition is unparalleled, superbly recreating the terror and suspense, the heroism and tragedy of this epic operation.'I know of no other work of literature of World War II as moving, as awesome and as accurate in its portrayal of human courage.' - General James A Gavin

Hodder Paperbacks

Beau Brummell

Ian Kelly
Authors:
Ian Kelly

David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough is a broadcaster and naturalist whose television career is now in its seventh decade. After studying Natural Sciences at Cambridge and a brief stint in publishing, he joined the BBC in 1952 and spent ten years making documentary programmes of all kinds, including the Zoo Quest series. In 1965, he was appointed Controller of a new network, BBC2, and then, after four years became editorially responsible for both BBC1 and BBC2.After eight years of administration, he returned to programme-making to write and present a thirteen-part series, Life on Earth, which surveyed the evolutionary history of animals and plants. This was followed by many other series which, between them, surveyed almost every aspect of life on earth.

27 Jul
Pavilion Arts Centre, Buxton

Brett Westwood and Stephen Moss at Buxton Festival

2pm

Tweet of the Day at Buxton

A fun Q&A with the author of KNIFE EDGE

Fergus McNeill Q&A

Cold war spies or hot action heroes? Cold war spies. I love the idea of hidden secrets and quiet menace - of a quiet and clever war, fought in the shadows. And John Le Carré writes with such effortless beauty in those early novels like Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy that it's impossible not to be swept away by the story. Drive or be driven? Well, I dislike traffic, and I hate speed cameras, but on balance, I'd say drive. Just. Music or TV? Music. I listen to music whenever I'm writing, using it to manage my mood like an emotional bookmark. Friends describe my musical tastes as weird, filmic or "that ambient rubbish" but it gets my head where it needs to be. My iPhone is full of tracks by artists like Deaf Center, Christina Vantzou, or A Winged Victory For The Sullen. Music also helps me to see places differently. I do a lot of my writing "on location" and listening to something sinister while visiting the scene of a fictional crime makes everything feel terribly real. Salad or steak? Steak. I'm told that I'm as far away from being a vegetarian as it's possible to be. In fact, until quite recently, this was my Facebook avatar: City or country? It's a tough choice, but I'd have to say country. I grew up in a tiny Scottish village, up in the hills between Glasgow, Stirling and Loch Lomond. We took my son there when he was eight years old and, while out for a walk, he stopped and gave me a puzzled look, asking what it was that he could hear. It took me a moment to realise that it was silence – he'd never heard it before. Morning or night? Night. All the best things happen at night. Also, I'm usually baffled in the morning, at least until the coffee kicks in. Pen or Pencil? Neither. My handwriting is achingly slow, and almost completely illegible. Thankfully, I'm a quick typist; I'd still be struggling to finish my first book if I had to scrawl it out by hand. When did you know you were going to be a writer? It still hasn't sunk in. I've had two books published, and my third is almost done, but I still feel as though I've gate-crashed a party I have no right to attend. As to when I knew I *wanted* to be a writer, that was when my secondary school English teacher inspired me with her absolute love of language. Thank you Mrs Pearson. Which authors are your biggest inspirations? I could choose so many great writers across different genres, but I'll mention two that aren't from crime. Firstly, C S Friedman, who wrote the stunning Coldfire Trilogy. In this story, she created one of the most charismatically evil characters I've ever read, and managed to sustain him as a main protagonist for three books. Her ability to stir empathy, where there should have been none, was a big influence on me when I was developing my own charming serial killer. The other author I'll highlight is Philip K Dick. Hugely talented, he was also the master of the unhappy ending, and I rather like books where there's no guarantee of a cheery conclusion, with everything neatly wrapped-up. When anything can happen, the stakes seem so much higher. Which book would you take to a desert island? Assuming that most islands come equipped with the Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare, I'd take The Lord Of The Rings by J R R Tolkien. Beneath the epic landscapes and the fantasy cast lies a beautiful story of sacrifice, duty, and friendship. If I could rewrite history, I would . . . …take back some of the stupid things I've said, especially if they hurt people close to me. While it might be tempting to undo historical atrocities, good things frequently arise from tragedy, and I'd hate my good intentions to make things worse. Better that I try and remedy my own mistakes – it's all I'm qualified to fix. In another age I would have been . . . Hopefully a full-time writer. My other skills - game designer, digital artist, photographer - aren’t really transferable to many historical eras. Of course, I'd have to do some work on my penmanship if I wanted anyone to actually read what I wrote... Who would your fantasy dinner guests be? Confining myself to people who are alive, and trying to ensure a group that would spark interesting conversation, I'd invite J K Rowling, Bill Gates, Sir David Attenborough, and Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. I'm confident they'd all hit it off and, so long as I got a grown-up to do the cooking, the evening would be a big success. Who would you choose to survive the apocalypse with? My wife and son. I wouldn't want to survive without them, and they're both much more practical than me, so I probably wouldn't be *able* to survive without them. Which book do you wish you had written? The answer to this question changes depending on my mood, but currently I’d say Lexicon by Max Barry. Reading it was like taking the first ever bite of a new favourite food. It powers forward with such confidence, really quickening the pulse. I can only imagine the buzz of creating something so relentless. If a film was made of your life, which actor would play you? I’m a big fan of fellow-Glaswegian Peter Capaldi, from his time on The Crow Road through to The Thick Of It. I’m sure he’d be up for the role, so long as he doesn’t have any other new projects on the horizon... Who is your favourite crime/thriller character across literature, film, TV, theatre etc? Rick Deckard, from Blade Runner / Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep. I've loved every version of him, from the first cut of the movie with the Marlowe-esque voice-over, to the depressive protagonist in the novel. There's something profoundly compelling about characters who are forced to face the truth about themselves through their investigation and pursuit of others, and in Deckard's case that truth is particularly poignant. At the same time, he's an anti-hero, dwarfed by larger-than-life adversaries, which makes it easier to empathise with him – and if you know the story, you'll see there's an irony in that.

Michael Parkinson

Born in Yorkshire, Michael Parkinson left school at sixteen with the ambition to play cricket for Yorkshire and England and to write about cricket for the Manchester Guardian. Although, he didn't manage to fulfil the first half of his ambition, he has since become one of the most successful journalists of his generation. He wrote a sports column for The Sunday Times for fifteen years and has also written for the Telegraph. He is also a legendary TV and radio presenter - his long-running chat show Parkinson was hugely popular for many years.

John Murray Press will publish the book of the BBC Radio 4 series Tweet of the Day, which highlights the songs and calls of Britain’s birds.

John Murray Press buys Tweet of the Day

John Murray Press buys Tweet of the Day

David Attenborough

Adventures of a Young Naturalist

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Andrea Wulf

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in England. She is the author of several acclaimed books. The Brother Gardeners won the American Horticultural Society Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize. Her book Founding Gardeners was on the New York Times bestseller list. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. She appears regularly on TV and radio.