Rupert Sheldrake - Ways to Go Beyond and Why They Work - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473653429
    • Publication date:24 Jan 2019
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    • ISBN:9781473653443
    • Publication date:06 Feb 2020

Ways to Go Beyond and Why They Work

Seven Spiritual Practices in a Scientific Age

By Rupert Sheldrake
Read by Rupert Sheldrake

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By the author of The Science Delusion a detailed account of how science can authenticate spirituality

By the author of The Science Delusion a detailed account of how science can authenticate spirituality

To go beyond is to move into a higher state of consciousness, to a place of bliss, greater understanding, love, and deep connectedness, a realm where we finally find life's meaning - experiences for which all spiritual seekers seek.

Dr Rupert Sheldrake, writing as both a scientist and a spiritual explorer, looks at seven spiritual practices that are personally transformative and have scientifically measurable effects. He combines the latest scientific research with his extensive knowledge of mystical traditions around the world to show how we may tune into more-than-human realms of consciousness through psychedelics, such as ayahuasca, and by taking cannabis. He also shows how everyday activities can have mystical dimensions, including sports and learning from animals. He discusses traditional religious practices such as fasting, prayer, and the celebration of festivals and holy days.

Why do these practices work? Are their effects all inside brains and essentially illusory? Or can we really make contact with forms of consciousness greater than our own?

We are in the midst of a spiritual revival. This book is an essential guide.

(P)2019 Hodder & Stoughton Limited

Biographical Notes

Dr Rupert Sheldrake is a biologist and author of more than eighty technical papers and ten books, including A New Science of Life. He was a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge, where he was Director of Studies in cell biology, and was also a Research Fellow of the Royal Society. From 2005-2010 he was the Director of the Perrott-Warrick Project for research on unexplained human abilities, funded from Trinity College, Cambridge. He is currently a Fellow of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in California, and a Visiting Professor at the Graduate Institute in Connecticut. He is married, has two sons and lives in London. Follow Rupert on Twitter @RupertSheldrake. His web site is www.sheldrake.org

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  • ISBN: 9781473688346
  • Publication date: 24 Jan 2019
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  • Imprint: Coronet
Praise for Rupert Sheldrake — :
Sheldrake will be seen as a prophet. — The Sunday Times
Rupert Sheldrake does science, humanity and the world at large a considerable favour. — The Independent
Certainly we need to accept the limitations of much current dogma and keep our minds open as we reasonably can. Sheldrake may help us do so through this well-written, challenging and always interesting book. — Financial Times
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