Molly Corbally - An Armful of Babies and a Cup of Tea - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473671508
    • Publication date:26 Jul 2018
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    • ISBN:9781473671515
    • Publication date:26 Jul 2018

An Armful of Babies and a Cup of Tea

Memoirs of a 1950s Health Visitor

By Molly Corbally

  • Paperback
  • £7.99

For fans of Call the Midwife - a warm-hearted memoir of a young district health visitor in the Midlands in the early years of the NHS, from the 1940s to the 1970s.

For all fans of Call the Midwife - a touching memoir of a young health visitor in postwar England.

After serving as a nurse in WW2, Molly Corbally joined the brand new NHS and became one of the first official District Health Visitors, attending to mothers and babies from all walks of life in the picturesque village near Coventry she came to call home. Social work was uncharted territory at the time, and Britain was very much worse for wear - TB, polio, measles and whooping cough were just some of the hazards new babies faced. Social conditions could also add to the problems, at a time when poverty and alcoholism were rife.

Armed with only her nursing training, her common sense and a desire to serve, Molly set out to win over a community and provide a new and valuable service in times of great change. As well as the challenges there was also joy and laughter, from the woman who finally had a baby after fifteen years of trying, to the woman who thought she should use marmalade as nappy cream, because the hospital had never taken the label off the jar they were using to store it.

Warm, witty and moving, An Armful of Babies is a vivid portrait of rural England in the post-war years, and a testament to an NHS in its own infancy and to what hasn't changed: the bond between parents and their children, and the importance of protecting that.

Biographical Notes

Molly Corbally served as a nurse in World War II, and on returning to England became one of the first District Health Visitors in the newly-formed NHS. She worked in the rural Midlands between 1940s-70s. She died in 2012, but her book was rediscovered in 2016 and republished here.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473671492
  • Publication date: 26 Jul 2018
  • Page count: 336
  • Imprint: Two Roads
A great discovery ... a wonderfully intimate sense of everyday life in a now-vanished Britain — Reader's Digest
Enchanting — Sunday Post

Bill Paterson

Bill Paterson was born in Glasgow. His theatre career includes being a founder member of 7:84 Theatre Company with the landmark production of The Cheviot, The Stag and the Black, Black Oil. Film and Television work includes Wives and Daughters, The Crow Road, The Witches, Truly Madly Deeply, Traffik, The Singing Detective, Aufweidersehn Pet, Comfort and Joy and The Killing Fields. He is a Fellow of the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.

Brenda Ashford

Brenda is 91 years old and lives near Milton Keynes. She worked as a Norland Nanny for over sixty years and loved every minute of it.

Cherry Denman

Almost educated at St Teresa's Convent, Effingham, Cherry Denman went on to study at the Ruskin School of Drawing, Oxford and at the Royal College of Art. An acclaimed artist and illustrator, she has written and illustrated several previous books including A Modern Book of Hours and The History Puzzle. Cherry is married with two children and, when not abroad, lives in London, where she tries to ignore the glazed looks of her loyal friends as she recounts her tales of typhoons and tarantulas, and pretends not to care when they assume her West African voodoo fetish earrings come from Accessorize. And how was she supposed to know that samphire was the new broccoli?

Christina Noble

Christina Noble was born in the slums of Dublin city. At the age of ten her mother died, and her alcoholic father could no longer care for her or her siblings. In the years that followed she suffered physical, emotional and sexual abuse in orphanages and on the streets, and after her marriage she was the victim of domestic violence. One night she had a dream about the street children of Vietnam and decided to make it reality. In 1989 she set up the Christina Noble Children's Foundation in Ho Chi Minh city and in 1997 she expanded it to Mongolia. To this day she continues to devote her life to improving the lives of the street children.

Clarissa Dickson Wright

Clarissa Dickson Wright found fame alongside Jennifer Paterson as one half of the much-loved TV cooking partnership Two Fat Ladies. She is the author of the bestselling memoir Spilling the Beans as well as many cookery books including The Game Cookbook and, most recently, Potty - her one-pot cookbook. She is also a passionate supporter of the Countryside Alliance and of rural life. She lives a little in London but mostly in Scotland.

Constance Briscoe

Constance Briscoe practises as a barrister and in 1996 became a part-time judge - one of the first black women to sit as a judge in the UK. She lives in Clapham with her two children, Martin and Francesca. Her partner is Tony Arlidge QC.

Craig Nelson

Craig Nelson, when he isn't trekking around the world, can be found in the jungle of New York City, where he is one of publishing's most recognized - and vaccinated - figures. He has spent time in locales ranging from the Amazon to the Yucatan Peninsula and plans on making Zanzibar his next trip, if only to round out the alphabet.

Denis Avey

Denis Avey was born in Essex in 1919. He fought in the desert during the Second World War and was captured and held as a Prisoner of War in a camp near Auschwitz III. In 2010 he received a British Hero of the Holocaust award. Denis lives in Derbyshire.

Dermot O'connor

Dermot O'Connor is a leading practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine and is the resident expert on the Sunday Times-associated website www.whatreallyworks.co.uk. Dermot writes and lectures internationally on health recovery and is European Director of the International Institute of Medical Qigong. He appears regularly in the press and on TV.

Dickie Bird

Born in 1933, the son of a miner, Dickie Bird has spent a life 'married to cricket'. He was signed up to play for Yorkshire age 19, and played on the county circuit for the next 13 years. In 1979 he became a Test match umpire. The announcement that he would umpire his final Test at Lord's in June 1996 signalled the end of an international career which has won him worldwide affection as the finest umpire in cricket history.

Dr Pierre Dukan

Dr Pierre Dukan has been a medical doctor specializing in nutrition since 1973. The author of many works on diet and nutrition, including the bestselling The Dukan Diet, he regularly writes in the press and appears on television.

Emma Pearse

Emma Pearse is an Australian journalist who lived in New York for over ten years, where she wrote for New York, Slate, Salon and Village Voice, among others. Emma now lives and works between Australia and New York. Sophie is her first book.

Franny Moyle

Franny Moyle has a degree in English and History of Art from St John's College, Cambridge. She enjoyed a career in arts programming at the BBC that culminated in her becoming the corporation's first Commissioner for Arts and Culture. She is now a freelance executive producer and writer as well as a director of the Hackney Empire, which is near her home in East London. She is married and has three children.

Garrison Keillor

Garrison Keillor was born in Anoka, Minnesota, and graduated from Minnesota University in 1966, already writing for the New Yorker. He hosted the live radio show 'A Prairie Home Companion', delivering a weekly monologue set in the quiet, fictional mid-western town of Lake Wobegon. He has been described as 'the best humorous writer to come out of America since Thurber.'

Gary Mulgrew

Gary Mulgrew was born in Glasgow in 1962 and lived there until he graduated from the University of Strathclyde. He joined NatWest Bank in 1983 and worked for them in Manchester, London, Tokyo and New York before joining the Royal Bank of Canada in 2000. His banking career ended in June 2002 when he was indicted by the US authorities for allegedly defrauding NatWest. After years of court battles and a high profile public campaign, he and two other members of the 'NatWest Three' were eventually extradited to America. Two years of detention in Houston, Texas were followed by two years in seven different prisons in the United States and England until his full release in early 2010. He now runs a number of successful businesses in the south of England, supported by his bankers, NatWest.

Halima Bashir

Halima Bashir grew up in the remote deserts of Darfur, Sudan, in a loving family that was part of the black African Zaghawa tribe. She proved herself to be academically gifted and went on to be the first person in her village to qualify as a medical doctor. But then war broke out and her life sprialled into an unimaginably dark nightmare. In 2005 she finally sought asylum in the UK where she continues to speak out about the violence in Sudan. In October 2008 she won the Victor Gollancz Human Rights Prize. Halima still lives in the UK with her husband and two sons and they were all granted UK citizenship in 2008.

Horatio Clare

Horatio Clare has worked on Front Row and Nightwaves, and produced Radio 3`s The Verb. Born in 1973, Clare has written for The Spectator, the New Statesman, the Guardian, and the Daily Telegraph.

Jacqueline Walker

Jacqueline Walker arrived in Britain in 1959. She has been a teacher and a mother of three, and taught creative writing as well completed two Arvon writing courses. Pilgrim State is her first book.

Jai Pausch

Jai Pausch became an impassioned advocate promoting pancreatic cancer research following the 2008 death of her husband, Randy Pausch, Ph.D, acclaimed Carnegie Mellon University professor and author of the international best seller, The Last Lecture. During Randy's twenty-three-month battle with cancer, Jai took on the responsibility as his cancer caregiver, learning specialised medical, palliative, and hospice care. Previously, Jai Pausch led the Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science Web team as the Director of Electronic Publications. Today, Pausch researches do-it-yourself instructional videos for home repairs and remodelling. She lives with her children, Dylan, Logan and Chloe, in Hampton Roads, Virginia.

James Fox

James Fox is the reader of SELECTIONS FROM EXODUS-DEUTERONOMY (audio). His distinguished career spans theatre, TV and film. His TV credits include Joanna Trollope's The Choir and A Question of Attribution. His film work includes A Passage to India, The Russia House, and Remains of the Day.