Aaron Gillies - How to Survive the End of the World (When it's in Your Own Head) - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • E-Book £P.O.R.
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    • ISBN:9781473659728
    • Publication date:19 Apr 2018
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    • ISBN:9781473660915
    • Publication date:12 Apr 2018

How to Survive the End of the World (When it's in Your Own Head)

An Anxiety Survival Guide

By Aaron Gillies

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

A hilarious, moving and genuinely helpful guide to surviving anxiety by Aaron Gillies, aka @TechnicallyRon

'Fast-paced, amusing and insightful' Guardian
'Just the laugh you need for when everything seems terrible.' Evening Standard
'A brilliant and funny read for the apocalyptically-minded' Matt Haig, author of Reasons to Stay Alive
'In a sea of books about mental health, it stands out for its humour, wisdom and lightness of touch' Adam Kay, author of This is Going to Hurt

There are plenty of books out there on how to survive a zombie apocalypse, all-out nuclear war, or Armageddon. But what happens when it feels like the world is ending every single time you wake up? That's what having anxiety is like - and How to Survive the End of the World is here to help. Or at least make you feel like you're not so alone.

From helping readers identify the enemy, to safeguarding the vulnerable areas of their lives, Aaron Gillies will examine the impact of anxiety, and give readers some tools to fight back - whether with medication, therapy, CBT, coping techniques, or simply with a dark sense of humour.

'I LOVED it because it's good to know that I'm not the only one pretending everything's fine, even when everything is fine' Juno Dawson, author of The Gender Games
'Hilarious and deeply insightful' Dean Burnett, author of The Idiot Brain

Biographical Notes

Aaron Gillies, aka @TechnicallyRon on twitter, is a comedian and writer. He has been featured in and written for The Poke, Buzzfeed, The Telegraph, The Guardian, The Huffington Post, amongst many others, and has produced viral content from 'Reasons my wife is crying' to 'a short guide to washing machine symbols' and 'a google autocompleted CV'. Aaron has written about mental health for many years in various publications.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473659711
  • Publication date: 10 Jan 2019
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Two Roads
Just the laugh you need when everything feels terrible. — Evening Standard
It is excellent. — Dr Fern Riddell
A frantically hilarious and deeply insightful exploration of life inside a brain that's constantly under siege from itself — Dean Burnett, author of The Idiot Brain
In his first book, he ably captures the daily ridiculousness, as well as the trauma of anxiety, and offers readers some tools with which to fight back — The Bookseller
Comic writer Aaron Gillies has achieved the impossible - he's written a mental health book that's as hilarious as it is insightful ... I truly believe books like this will start conversations that will change (and save) lives — Catherine Renton, Thought Catalog
One of the things that really marks Aaron's book out from others on the market that tackle the topic of mental health is that it's quite simply laugh-out-loud funny. He manages to harness the ludicrous, the awkward, and the downright bizarre things he's done because of mental health issues, and turn them into hilarious anecdotes. — Independent
A brilliant and funny read for the apocalyptically-minded . . . If you enjoy his stuff on the Twitter, you'll love him minus a character limit — Matt Haig
I LOVED it because it's good to know that I'm not the only one pretending everything's fine, even when everything is fine. — Juno Dawson, author of The Gender Games
In his first book, he ably captures the daily ridiculousness, as well as the trauma of anxiety, and offers readers some tools with which to fight back — The Bookseller
How to Survive the End of the World ... helps shed light on a subject that is still misunderstood by many people — Yorkshire Post