Find your favourite award winner, best seller or debut talent Author from Hodder and Stoughton Publisher
Our Authors
Kristin Armstrong

Kristin Armstrong was married to cyclist Lance Armstrong for five years, raising their three children while living in France and Spain. She is the author of a children's book, Lance Armstrong, The Race of His Life, and a contributing editor for Runner's World magazine. Kristin is passionate about her Christian faith, her family, her friends, and her career. She speaks French and Spanish, is a marathon runner, and enjoys cooking, reading, painting, and travel. Kristin now lives in Austin, Texas with her family - her son Luke and twin daughters, Grace and Isabelle.
Alexander Armstrong

Alexander Armstrong is a presenter, comedian and actor and part of the comedy duo Armstrong and Miller. He presents the hit BBC show Pointless with Richard Osman. As well as regular appearances on panel shows such as Have I Got News For You, he also presents a show on Classic FM and writes a column for the Telegraph.
Michael Arnold

Michael Arnold lives in Hampshire with his wife and young son. His childhood holidays were spent visiting castles and battlefields but his fascination with the civil wars was piqued partly by the fact that his hometown and region of Hampshire are steeped in civil war history. You can find out more about Michael Arnold at www.hodder.co.uk or www.michaelarnold-net, or follow him on Twitter at @MikeArnold01.
Peter Arnold

Peter Arnold is an author and editor, most of whose 50 or so books concern sports and games. He has written histories and encyclopedias of boxing, cricket, football and the Olympic Games, and wrote the official FIFA guide to the 1994 Football World Cup in the USA. He has also worked as editor and main contributor of part-works on boxing and football, and has ghost-written instruction books for a West Indian Test fast bowler and a Canadian world snooker champion.Peter devised some of the mental games for the television series The Crystal Maze. Several of his books are on table games, including some on individual card games, and he has written three books on gambling, one of which was described by a New York author as 'the best history of gambling'. Many of his books have been published in the USA and in foreign-language editions.
Jake Arnott

Jake Arnott was born in 1961, and lives in London. He is the author of THE LONG FIRM, published by Sceptre in 1999 and subsequently made into an acclaimed BBC TV series. His second novel, HE KILLS COPPERS, was also made into a series by Channel 4. He has since published the novels TRUECRIME, JOHNNY COME HOME, THE DEVIL'S PAINTBRUSH and THE HOUSE OF RUMOUR.
Max Arthur

Max Arthur is acclaimed for his speciality in sourcing first-hand recollections of the twentieth century, particularly the First and Second World War. He is the author of many bestsellers including 'Forgotten Voices of the Great War' and 'Forgotten Voices of the Second World War' which were both written in association with the Imperial War Museum. He has presented two television documentaries based on his books: The Brits Who Fought For Spain for the History Channel and 'Dambusters'. Arthur was recognised in the 2013 New Year Honours with an OBE for his services to military history.
James Arthur

In December 2012, Middlesbrough born James Arthur won the X Factor and his debut single Impossible became the biggest winner's song of all time. After a two year break, in 2016 James made a triumphant return with his single Say You Won't Let Go which went on to become a smash hit around the world, reaching No. 1 on the Official UK Singles Chart, No. 1 on the Radio Airplay Chart in the USA, and picking up over 1.5 billion sales and streams globally. The album Back From The Edge followed, topping the Official Albums Chart in the UK, with global sales of over 1 million. Earlier this year, James was nominated for two awards at the prestigious BRIT Awards 2017 and went on to sell out multiple tours worldwide. Back to the Boy is James' first book. For more info on James, check out www.jamesarthurofficial.com.
Russell Ash

Russell Ash was best known for his annual THE TOP TEN OF EVERYTHING and other popular reference works, but he was also the author of numerous humour titles. His extensive research work encompasses biographical studies and genealogy. www.RussellAsh.com
Brenda Ashford

Brenda is 91 years old and lives near Milton Keynes. She worked as a Norland Nanny for over sixty years and loved every minute of it.
David Ashton

DAVID ASHTON was born in Greenock in 1941. He studied at Central Drama School, London, from 1964 to 1967, and most recently appeared in The Last King of Scotland and The Etruscan Smile. David started writing in 1984 and he has seen many of his plays and TV adaptations broadcast - he wrote early episodes of EastEnders and Casualty, and twelve McLevy series for BBC Radio 4.inspectormclevy.com
Jenn Ashworth

Jenn Ashworth was born in 1982 in Preston. She studied English at Cambridge and since then has gained an MA from Manchester University, trained as a librarian and run a prison library in Lancashire. She now lectures in Creative Writing at the University of Lancaster. Her first novel, A Kind of Intimacy, was published in 2009 and won a Betty Trask Award. In 2011 her second, Cold Light, was published by Sceptre and she was chosen by BBC's The Culture Show as one of the twelve Best New British Novelists. In 2013 her third novel, The Friday Gospels, was published to resounding critical acclaim. She lives in Lancaster with her husband, son and daughter.
Claire Askew

Claire Askew is a poet, novelist and the current Writer in Residence at the University of Edinburgh. Her debut novel in progress was the winner of the 2016 Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize, and longlisted for the 2014 Peggy Chapman-Andrews (Bridport) Novel Award. Claire holds a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Edinburgh and has won a variety of accolades for her work, including the Jessie Kesson Fellowship and a Scottish Book Trust New Writers Award. Her debut poetry collection, This changes things, was published by Bloodaxe in 2016 and shortlisted for the Edwin Morgan Poetry Award and a Saltire First Book Award. In 2016 Claire was selected as a Scottish Book Trust Reading Champion, and she works as the Scotland tutor for women's writing initiatives Write Like A Grrrl! and #GrrrlCon.
Michka Assayas

Michka Assayas is a music journalist and novelist who lives and works in Paris. Michka met Bono in London in 1980, and was the first journalist to champion U2 outside Ireland and the United Kingdom. Michka and Bono have spent the last two years putting this book together at Bono's home in Dublin, and in Paris, Bologna and on the French Riviera.
Gilles Asselin

Gilles Asselin, founder and executive director of New Jersey-based SoCoCo Intercultural, is a program designer, trainer and consultant who helps international executives and managers succeed when working across cultures.
Mike Atherton

Mike Atherton was educated at Manchester Grammar School and Cambridge University. He was made captain of the England cricket team in 1993 at the age of 25. He was one of the most determined batsmen of the nineties, and as an opener, a vital component of the England team. Atherton played professional cricket for Lancashire and England for 15 years, despite a serious back complaint. He represented England in 115 Test matches and captained his country on a record 54 occasions.
David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough is a broadcaster and naturalist whose television career is now in its seventh decade. After studying Natural Sciences at Cambridge and a brief stint in publishing, he joined the BBC. Since the launch of his famous Zoo Quest series in 1954 he has surveyed almost every aspect of life on earth and brought it to the viewing public. His latest programme, Blue Planet II, was the most-watched nature documentary of all time.
Jean M. Auel

Jean M. Auel is one of the world's most esteemed and beloved authors. Her extensive factual research has earned her the respect of renowned scientists, archaeologists and anthropologists around the globe, culminating in her being made an Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French Minister of Culture and Communication in 2008.
Oliver August

Oliver August was born in 1971 and grew up in Germany. After studying Politics, Philosophy and Economics at the University of Oxford, he joined The Times and became its youngest-ever New York correspondent. Since 1999, he has been the paper's Beijing bureau chief, living in a traditional Chinese courtyard home near the Forbidden City.
Saint Augustine

Born in 354 AD, Saint Augustine was one of the greatest bishops in the history of the Christian Church. He worked for 34 years in a diocese of Algeria, North Africa. A great scholar, there still survive 113 of his books and treatises, over 200 letters and more than 500 sermons. His best known works are CONFESSIONS and THE CITY OF GOD. He died at Hippo in 430 AD.
Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born in 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, where her father was rector. When she was 25 the family moved to Bath till her father's death in 1805, then to Chawton in Hampshire where Jane lived with her mother and sister. She wrote six novels. Sense and Sensibility was first in 1811, then Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma(1816). Northanger Abbey and Persusaion were both published posthumously, in 1817. Jane Austen died in 1817. Well-received during her lifetime, since her death she has become known as not just one of the greatest writers of English fiction, but one of the most beloved.