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Stephan Abarbanell

Stephan Abarbanell was born in 1957 and grew up in Hamburg. He studied protestant theology and general rhetoric in Hamburg, Tübingen and Berkeley/USA. He also worked as a chaplain at the University Hospital San Francisco. For many years he was chief of programming at rbb Broadcasting, and is now in charge of cultural affairs with the public rbb-Televison and Radio in Berlin. He lives with his wife in Potsdam. Displaced is his first novel.
Stig Abell

Stig Abell is the editor and publisher of the Times Literary Supplement, which he thinks is the most important literary publication in the world. He presented a weekly radio programme on LBC for the last three years, in which he got the chance to talk about political and social issues with anybody who called in, and pops up as a commentator on Sky News and the BBC. He has written for almost every newspaper in Britain, and one or two in America as well. He now presents Front Row on Radio 4.Previously, he had been the Director of the Press Complaints Commission and the Managing Editor of Britain's biggest newspaper (The Sun). He also worked in crisis communications, although not for very long. How Britain (Really) Works is his first book.
Mary Aiken

Dr. Mary Aiken is the world's foremost forensic cyberpsychologist. She is the director of the Cyberpsychology Research Network, an advisor to Europol, and has conducted research and training workshops with multiple global agencies from INTERPOL to the F.B.I. and White House. She is a Distinguished Professor of the Practice of Cyber Analytics at the Asia-Pacific Institute for Resilience and Sustainability (AIRS) anchored at Hawaii Pacific University. Her research interests include cyber security, organized cybercrime, cyberstalking, human trafficking and the rights of the child online. She is a member of the advisory board of the Hague Justice Portal, a foundation for International peace, justice and security. Her groundbreaking work inspired the CBS television series CSI: Cyber. She is based in Ireland.www.maryaiken.com
Alice Albinia

Alice Albinia read English literature at Cambridge and South Asian history at SOAS, then worked for two years in Delhi as a journalist, critic and editor. Written during an audacious journey through Afghanistan, India, Pakistan and Tibet, Empires of the Indus is her first book, for which she won a Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for work in progress.
Sameem Ali

Sameem Ali lives in Manchester with her husband and two sons. She is active in local politics and is a councillor for Moss Side, Manchester. She also speaks openly about forced marriage at government conferences. Find out more at www.sameemali.com
Charles Allen

Charles Allen was born in India, where six generations of his family served under the British Raj. After being educated in England, he returned to the Indian sub-continent in 1966 to work with Voluntary Service Overseas in Nepal. He ended his service with a long walk through the Himalayas that won him the Sunday Telegraph Traveller of the year trophy in 1967. Since then he has trekked and climbed extensively in the Himalayas and in other corners of the world. He is the author of many highly acclaimed books.
Ali Almossawi

Ali Almossawi works on the Firefox team at Mozilla and is an alumnus of MIT's Engineering Systems Division (MS) and Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science (MS). Previous stints included working as a research associate at Harvard and as a collaborator at the MIT Media Lab. His writing has appeared in Wired and Scientific American.
Tahmima Anam

Tahmima Anam was born in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 1975 and grew up in Paris, New York City, and Bangkok. She trained as an anthropologist, earning a PhD from Harvard University. In 2005 she completed an MA in Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, London, and is the recipient of a Writing Fellowship from the Arts Council of England. She lives in London. Tahmima won the Commonwealth Writers Prize for A GOLDEN AGE. Find out more about her at www.tahmima.com
Chris Anderson

CHRIS ANDERSON is TED's president and head curator. Trained as a journalist after graduating from Oxford University, Anderson launched more than 100 successful magazines and websites before turning his attention to TED, which he and his non-profit organization acquired in 2001. His TED mantra - 'ideas worth spreading' - continues to blossom on an international scale. He lives in New York City.
Geraint Anderson

Before sacrificing his soul to dark forces in the Square Mile, Cityboy was a genuine left-wing hippy and political activist, complete with ponytail and hoop earrings. His dream of becoming a global traveller was cruelly dashed when his brother got him an interview at a French bank in the City, which would set him on the rocky road to destruction and despair.
Russell Ash

Russell Ash was best known for his annual THE TOP TEN OF EVERYTHING and other popular reference works, but he was also the author of numerous humour titles. His extensive research work encompasses biographical studies and genealogy. www.RussellAsh.com
Oliver August

Oliver August was born in 1971 and grew up in Germany. After studying Politics, Philosophy and Economics at the University of Oxford, he joined The Times and became its youngest-ever New York correspondent. Since 1999, he has been the paper's Beijing bureau chief, living in a traditional Chinese courtyard home near the Forbidden City.
Chris Ayres

Chris Ayres is the west coast correspondent for The Times. He was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, grew up in the Scottish borders and was educated at the University of Hull and City University, London, before joining The Times in 1997. Ayres held the positions of media business correspondent and Wall Street correspondent, based in New York, before taking up his current position in L.A. He was an embedded reporter with the United States Marines during the 2003 Iraq War, his coverage earning him a nomination for the British Press Awards 'foreign correspondent of the year'.
Ian Ayres

Ian Ayres is a professor at Yale both in the Law School and in the School of Management, as well as a lawyer and author. He is a regular commentator on National Public Radio in America and a columnist for Forbes magazine. A contributor to the New York Times and editor of the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, he has written several books.
Barney Bardsley

Barney Elizabeth Bardsley took a degree in languages at Hull University in 1979. Throughout the 1980s she worked in London as a freelance arts journalist, and for two years was books and arts editor for the Tribune newspaper. Her first book, Flowers in Hell, about women and crime, was published by Pandora Press in 1986. She then trained in T`ai Chi, and as a dancer and taught movement skills to actors in London and Hungary. From 1994 to 2004 she looked after her husband Tim, during his long struggle with cancer. She now lives in Leeds - with her daughter, Molly, and dog, Muffin - teaches T`ai Chi and writes. All her spare time is devoted to her unruly garden and allotment.
Louis Bayard

Louis Bayard lives in Washington. He has written several novels, including THE PALE BLUE EYE which was shortlisted for the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Crime Award.
Peter Bazalgette

Peter Bazalgette was Chair of Arts Council England from 2013-2017. He also chaired the UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation. He was educated at Dulwich College and read Law at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge but escaped the law to spend most of his career working in television. He devised some of the biggest entertainment shows in recent TV history, such as Ready Steady Cook and Changing Rooms, and brought Big Brother to the UK. He now chairs ITV. His previous books include Billion Dollar Game and The Food Revolution (co-authored). In 2011 he was knighted for services to broadcasting.
Susan Beale

Susan Beale was brought up on Cape Cod but lives in the UK. She is a recent graduate of the Bath Spa MA in Creative Writing. The Good Guy is her first novel. It was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award 2016.
Adam Becker

Adam Becker is a science writer with a PhD in astrophysics and an undergraduate degree in philosophy. His writing has appeared in the BBC and New Scientist. He has recorded a video series with the BBC and several podcasts with the Story Collider. He is also a Visiting Scholar at UC Berkeley's Office for History of Science and Technology. He lives in Oakland, CA.
Jonathan Beckman

Jonathan Beckman is senior editor of Literary Review. He has degrees in English from the University of Cambridge and Intellectual and Cultural History from Queen Mary, University of London. In 2010, he won the Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for Non-Fiction.