Kate Rhodes

Kate Rhodes

Kate Rhodes was born in London. She has worked as a teacher and university lecturer, and now writes full-time.

Kate began her writing career as a poet, publishing two prizewinning collections. She has held a Hawthornden fellowship and been shortlisted for Forward and Bridport Prizes. She has written five novels in the Alice Quentin series, CROSSBONES YARD, A KILLING OF ANGELS, THE WINTER FOUNDLINGS, RIVER OF SOULS and BLOOD SYMMETRY, the first of which was selected by Val McDermid for the Harrogate Crime festival's New Blood panel championing new crime writers. In 2014 Kate Rhodes won the Ruth Rendell Short Story Award, sponsored by the charity InterAct.

Visit her website at http://katerhodes.org or follow her on Twitter @K_RhodesWriter.

Mulholland Books

Blood Symmetry

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes
Mulholland Books

River of Souls

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes
Mulholland Books

The Alice Quentin Collection 1-3

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes
Mulholland Books

The Winter Foundlings

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes

The girl was lying on the steps of the Foundling Museum, dressed all in white.Four girls have disappeared in North London. Three are already dead. Britain's most prolific child killer, Louis Kinsella, has been locked up in Northwood high-security hospital for over a decade. Now more innocents are being slaughtered, and they all have a connection to his earlier crimes. Psychologist Alice Quentin is doing research at Northwood. She was hoping for a break from her hectic London life, but she'll do anything to help save a child - even if it means forming a relationship with a charismatic, ruthless murderer. But Kinsella is slow to give away his secrets, and time is running out for the latest kidnap victim, who is simply trying to survive...

Mulholland Books

A Killing of Angels

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes
Mulholland Books

Crossbones Yard

Kate Rhodes
Authors:
Kate Rhodes
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KATE RHODES

Visit Kate's website for more information about her and her books.
Kate Rhodes on her love affair with libraries.

A Library Love Affair

Something criminal is happening to the library service. And I’m not talking about crazed librarians bludgeoning borrowers to death with blood-spattered copies of Paradise Lost, (although that would make a fun premise for a thriller.) It’s the huge reduction in public funding which concerns me. I would never have become a writer without access to an endless supply of free books. My love affair with libraries began when I was twelve years old, the moment I walked through the door of Blackheath library. The rooms smelled of leisure and excitement, dust gathering on a million pages. After that first visit I called regularly on my way home from school to pick up battered novels by Dick Francis, Ian Fleming and Patricia Highsmith. I judged whether to borrow a book by the number of stamps inside the cover, allowing popular opinion to guide me. Surely Casino Royale must be worth reading if hundreds of people had borrowed it? And the library stocked an infinite supply of yellow-jacketed Gollancz thrillers, every one more glamorous than the worthy books school teachers rammed down our throats. Libraries became even more important when I reached university. The campus was a wilderness of badly deigned Sixties architecture, harsh winds funnelling between tower blocks. But the library was an oasis of quiet, well stocked with American literature. Within weeks I was obsessed by Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Salinger. I’d sit in a window seat for days, churning out essays, ignoring the sea of concrete outside. I carried on using libraries avidly when I started to write. The neighbours in the flat next to mine in Shad Thames played jazz from mid-afternoon until late at night, and my local library became a hiding place. I’d rush there as soon as I finished teaching, and the librarians would smile at me kindly when it grew dark outside, reminding me that it was time to leave. I’m still a regular borrower at the excellent library in Cambridge, my home town. Much of my first novel was written at a table in the crime section on the ground floor. Occasionally blood curdling shrieks would emanate from the children’s section, but no violent crime was being committed. It was just kids at storytelling workshops, re-enacting sections of The Gruffaloes and Where the Wild Things Are, with great enthusiasm, which brings me neatly back to my first point. On a selfish level I mourn the decline in library funding, but it saddens me even more that future generations will have less opportunity to read books which inspire them. Still, there is some comfort. Cambridge author Alison Bruce has been nominated for a Dagger in the Library award, which has kept my dream alive. Maybe one day, I’ll follow her. I would love nothing more than to see my own books grow dog-eared in my local library, worn out from constant use.
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I started life as a teacher, then became a poet, and now I'm a crime writer.