Artemis Cooper

Artemis Cooper

Artemis Cooper is the author of a number of books including Cairo in the War, 1939-1945, Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David and, most recently, Patrick Leigh Fermor: An Adventure. With her husband, Antony Beevor, she wrote Paris After the Liberation, 1945-1949. She has edited two collections of letters as well as Words of Mercury, an anthology of the work of Patrick Leigh Fermor; and, with Colin Thubron, she edited The Broken Road, the final volume of Leigh Fermor's European trilogy.
COSTA BOOK AWARDS 2012

Shortlist Announced

We're excited to announce that we have two books on the Costa Book Awards shortlist: PATRICK LEIGH FERMOR by Artemis Cooper is shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and SNAKE ROPES by Jess Richards is shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award.
John Murray

Elizabeth Jane Howard

Artemis Cooper
Authors:
Artemis Cooper
John Murray

Cairo in the War

Artemis Cooper
Authors:
Artemis Cooper
John Murray

Patrick Leigh Fermor

Artemis Cooper
Authors:
Artemis Cooper

Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) was a war hero whose exploits in Crete are legendary, and above all he is widely acclaimed as the greatest travel writer of our times, notably for his books about his walk across pre-war Europe, A Time of Gifts and Between the Woods and the Water; he was a self-educated polymath, a lover of Greece and the best company in the world.Artemis Cooper has drawn on years of interviews and conversations with Paddy and his cloest friends as well as having complete access to his archives. Her beautifully crafted biography portrays a man of extraordinary gifts - no one wore their learning so playfully, nor inspired such passionate friendship.

Interview with Artemis Cooper

'Everyone fell in love with Paddy Leigh Fermor'

Read the Telegraph's interview with Artemis Cooper, where the biographer talks about Patrick Leigh Fermor, the impact he had on others, and writing his biography.
Robert Macfarlane delights in a biography of his writer-adventurer hero

Fantastic review in The Guardian

'Patrick Leigh Fermor survived enough assaults on his existence to make Rasputin seem like a quitter . . . He was elegant as a cat, darkly handsome, unboreable, curious, fearless, fortunate, blessed with a near eidetic memory, and is surely one of the great English prose stylists of his generation . . . '