Andrew Cowan

Andrew Cowan

Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and educated at the University of East Anglia. Pig, his first novel, won The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, a Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Author`s Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award. He is also the author of the writing guidebook The Art of Writing and three other novels: Common Ground, Crustaceans and What I Know. He is the Director of the Creative Writing programme at UEA.
Sceptre

Worthless Men

By Andrew Cowan

It's market day in an English city two years into the Great War. The farmers are coming in from the country, the cattle are being driven through the streets and that evening a trainload of wounded soldiers is due to arrive.
At the local mansion, its new hospital tents to the ready, waits Montague Beckwith, himself a psychological casualty of the war. In the town's poorest quarter, Winnie Barley prays that Walter, her missing son, will be on the train (but that her violent husband is not). In the pharmacy, Gertie Dobson dreams of romance while her father keeps unsuitable men at bay. And everywhere is Walter, a ghostly presence who watches as the girl he loved from a distance is drawn into Montague's orbit.

Weaving together multiple viewpoints, Andrew Cowan creates a panoramic, extraordinarily vivid portrait of a place as individual as it is archetypal. Here is a community where the war permeates high and low; where the factory now produces barbed wire, the women are doing the men's jobs, and the young men are no longer so eager to answer the King's call. And here is the tragic story of a casual betrayal, and a boy who proved that those at the bottom of the heap - the worthless ones - could be the most valiant of them all.

A brilliant novel, original, powerfully written, and very movingDistinguished by its remarkable close focus on life in Britain and the families back home. From multiple viewpoints, Cowan - a highly talented but still under-recognised novelist - follows working-class teenager Walter, troubled officer Montague, and the girl who attracts them both, beautiful Gertie, the daughter of their local chemist-cum-vet-cum-abortionist. Both Montague and Gertie's father have a keen amateur interest in "eugenical science", which held out a crazed initial hope that the war would be good for the fitness of the species . . . memorable for its time-travelling density of period evocationProvincial realism it may be; to suggest it's nothing special is too modest by half.A wonderful and moving book, wholly original in its treatment of the war's bleak surrealism. I was completely transported. It's sensuous and funny and somehow manages never to be moralising.Cowan's serious-minded project suggests, intriguingly, an un-spoken truth - that the lack of all those young soldiers on the home front meant a calmer, saner society . . . Yet this is no romanticised history - Cowan never lets us forget the earthy truths of lifeAndrew Cowan's fifth novel takes a loud subject - the First World War; its casualties and the disastrous effect it has on an English town - and quietens it with detail . . . it is heartening to see a writer with several books behind him take a risk.Packed with beautiful period details . . . His style is creative but the creativity serves the story and there's never the feeling, as can be the case, of the style getting in the way of the lives of these people. The result is a haunting, and often moving, record of life in a market town during the Great War.His voices ring so true they break your heart. This novel has the feel of an elegiac poem and is an absolute delight to read.

A novel about the First World War that is as mesmerising as it is unusual, a triumphant new work by one of the most acclaimed writers of the 90s.

Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and educated at the University of East Anglia. PIG, his first novel (published in 1996), was longlisted for the Booker, shortlisted for five other literary awards and won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, a Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Authors' Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award. He is also the author of the writing guidebook THE ART OF WRITING FICTION and four other novels: COMMON GROUND, CRUSTACEANS, WHAT I KNOW and WORTHLESS MEN, which will be published by Sceptre in 2013. He is the Director of the Creative Writing programme at UEA.A dazzling new take on a subject of perennial interest, showing the impact of the First World War on the home front.The most ambitious and accomplished novel yet by a writer whose first novel, PIG, won many awards.Strong appeal to readers of Birdsong, War Horse and the classics of WW1 literature, as well as to readers of The Remains of the Day.Andrew Cowan is Director of UEA's creative writing courses and very well connectedA serious contender for the Booker and Costa

A novel about the First World War that is as mesmerising as it is unusual, a triumphant new work by one of the most acclaimed writers of the 90s.

It`s market day in an English city two years into the Great War. The farmers are coming in from the country, the cattle are being driven through the streets and that evening a trainload of wounded soldiers is due to arrive. 
At the local mansion, its new hospital tents to the ready, waits Montague Beckwith, himself a psychological casualty of the war. In the town`s poorest quarter, Winnie Barley prays that Walter, her missing son, will be on the train `but that her violent husband is not`. In the pharmacy, Gertie Dobson dreams of romance while her father keeps unsuitable men at bay. And everywhere is Walter, a ghostly presence who watches as the girl he loved from a distance is drawn into Montague`s orbit.

Weaving together multiple viewpoints, Andrew Cowan creates a panoramic, extraordinarily vivid portrait of a place as individual as it is archetypal. Here is a community where the war permeates high and low where the factory now produces barbed wire, the women are doing the men`s jobs, and the young men are no longer so eager to answer the King`s call. And here is the tragic story of a casual betrayal, and a boy who proved that those at the bottom of the heap - the worthless ones - could be the most valiant of them all.


 

Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and educated at Beanfield Comprehensive and the University of East Anglia. PIG, his first novel `published in 1996`, was longlisted for the Booker, shortlisted for five other literary awards and won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, a Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Author`s Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award. He is also the author of COMMON GROUND, CRUSTACEANS, WHAT I KNOW and WORTHLESS MEN, to be published by Sceptre in 2013. He is Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at UEA and lives in Norwich with the writer Lynne Bryan and their daughter, Rose.

Sceptre

Common Ground

By Andrew Cowan

Ashley, a disaffected geography teacher and Jay, a printer in a local arts project, are about to start a family, though both have mixed feelings about becoming parents, especially when their house is crumbling around them and their neighbourhood seems increasingly anarchic. As Jay becomes deeply involved in the fight to save the ancient woodland of Hogslea Common from a planned motorway, Ashley corresponds with his carefree brother, who is backpacking round the world. With the gap between the couple widening as steadily as the cracks in their walls, Ashley has to choose between his parents' values and abandoning a society he finds increasingly precarious and menacing.



By the author of the award-winning PIG, this is a sharply observed, often funny and thought-provoking tale of modern life and of the choices we all have to make - as parents, children and members of society.

Cowan has the rare ability to write an ambitious novel in a tone which is both intimate and engaging...He creates a fictional world at once bleak and tender, a beautifully exact portrait of a 1900s inner cityCowan's observation is superb[He writes with] freshness and authenticity..Cowan understands the real pain of life's moments of pathosA fine and acutely perceived novelPRAISE FOR PIGA coming-of-age story as strange and surprising, in its way, as THE CATCHER IN THE RYEA first novel of extraordinary poise and accomplishment, treating a boy's coming of age amid the squalid realities of the new British underclass with a delicacy and lyricism which is both gripping and movingThe detail is immaculately recorded; the effect is heartbreaking[A] wholly satisfying book, quietly beautiful and inescapably ominousBeautifully evoked ... Cowan writes with a deceptive simplicityA wonderful first novel

By the multi-garlanded author of PIG, a novel that asks - what kind of world do you want to bring your child up in and are you brave enough to change it?

Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and educated at the University of East Anglia. PIG, his first novel (published in 1996), was longlisted for the Booker, shortlisted for five other literary awards and won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, a Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Authors' Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award. He is also the author of the writing guidebook THE ART OF WRITING FICTION and four other novels: COMMON GROUND, CRUSTACEANS, WHAT I KNOW and WORTHLESS MEN, which will be published by Sceptre in 2013. He is the Director of the Creative Writing programme at UEA.The critically acclaimed second novel by the award-winning author of PIG, long unavailable and now reissued to coincide with his new hardback, WORTHLESS MEN.WORTHLESS MEN is likely to make a significant impact - major new novel which could well be a prize contender, and will renew interest in Andrew Cowan's backlist.Cowan's first novel, PIG, was one of the most celebrated debuts of the 90s, for which he won The Sunday Times Young Writers award, a Betty Trask award, and the Author's Club First Novel Award.All four of Cowan's novels have been highly and widely praisedHe is currently director of UEA's Creative Writing Courses, and well connected

By the multi-garlanded author of PIG, a novel that asks - what kind of world do you want to bring your child up in and are you brave enough to change it?


 


 

Ashley, a disaffected geography teacher and Jay, a printer in a local arts project, are about to start a family, though both have mixed feelings about becoming parents, especially when their house is crumbling around them and their neighbourhood seems increasingly anarchic. As Jay becomes deeply involved in the fight to save the ancient woodland of Hogslea Common from a planned motorway, Ashley corresponds with his carefree brother, who is backpacking round the world. With the gap between the couple widening as steadily as the cracks in their walls, Ashley has to choose between his parents` values and abandoning a society he finds increasingly precarious and menacing.



By the author of the award-winning PIG, this is a sharply observed, often funny and thought-provoking tale of modern life and of the choices we all have to make - as parents, children and members of society.


 

Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and educated at Beanfield Comprehensive and the University of East Anglia. PIG, his first novel `published in 1996`, was longlisted for the Booker, shortlisted for five other literary awards and won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, a Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Author`s Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award. He is also the author of COMMON GROUND, CRUSTACEANS, WHAT I KNOW and WORTHLESS MEN, to be published by Sceptre in 2013. He is Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at UEA and lives in Norwich with the writer Lynne Bryan and their daughter, Rose.

Sceptre

Pig

By Andrew Cowan
When his grandmother dies, and his grandfather is removed to a home, fifteen-year-old Danny determines to look after their elderly pig and ramshackle garden. Here, on the ragged edge of a blighted new town, Danny and his Indian girlfriend Surinder create a fragile haven from the enclosing world of racist neighbours and stifling families, a summer's refuge from the precariousness of their future.A coming-of-age story as strange and surprising, in its way, as THE CATCHER IN THE RYECowan's writing is reminiscent of Roddy Doyle's in his ability to recreate the intense emotions of youth.A first novel of extraordinary poise and accomplishment, treating a boy's coming of age amid the squalid realities of the new British underclass with a delicacy and lyricism which is both gripping and movingThe detail is immaculately recorded; the effect is heartbreaking[A] wholly satisfying book, quietly beautiful and inescapably ominousBeautifully evoked ... Cowan writes with a deceptive simplicityA wonderful first novelCowan's beautifully drawn, multi award-winning first novel of love in the hostile climate of modern British societyAndrew Cowan was born in Corby and is the author of two further novels, COMMON GROUND and CRUSTACEANS (Sceptre, 2000). He is a graduate of the University of East Anglia Creative Writing course, and lives in Norwich with the writer Lynne Bryan and their daughter.Cowan's dazzling debut, one of the most acclaimed novels of the 90sWinner of five major awards: the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year, the Betty Trask Award, the Ruth Hadden Memorial Prize, the Author's Club First Novel Award and a Scottish Council Book Award.

Cowan`s beautifully drawn, multi award-winning first novel of love in the hostile climate of modern British society
When his grandmother dies, and his grandfather is removed to a home, fifteen-year-old Danny determines to look after their elderly pig and ramshackle garden. Here, on the ragged edge of a blighted new town, Danny and his Indian girlfriend Surinder create a fragile haven from the enclosing world of racist neighbours and stifling families, a summer`s refuge from the precariousness of their future.
Andrew Cowan was born in Corby and is the author of two further novels, COMMON GROUND and CRUSTACEANS `Sceptre, 2000`. He is a graduate of the University of East Anglia Creative Writing course, and lives in Norwich with the writer Lynne Bryan and their daughter.

Sceptre

Worthless Men

Andrew Cowan
Authors:
Andrew Cowan

It's market day in an English city two years into the Great War. The farmers are coming in from the country, the cattle are being driven through the streets and that evening a trainload of wounded soldiers is due to arrive. At the local mansion, its new hospital tents to the ready, waits Montague Beckwith, himself a psychological casualty of the war. In the town's poorest quarter, Winnie Barley prays that Walter, her missing son, will be on the train (but that her violent husband is not). In the pharmacy, Gertie Dobson dreams of romance while her father keeps unsuitable men at bay. And everywhere is Walter, a ghostly presence who watches as the girl he loved from a distance is drawn into Montague's orbit. Weaving together multiple viewpoints, Andrew Cowan creates a panoramic, extraordinarily vivid portrait of a place as individual as it is archetypal. Here is a community where the war permeates high and low; where the factory now produces barbed wire, the women are doing the men's jobs, and the young men are no longer so eager to answer the King's call. And here is the tragic story of a casual betrayal, and a boy who proved that those at the bottom of the heap - the worthless ones - could be the most valiant of them all. Â

Sceptre

Pig

Andrew Cowan
Authors:
Andrew Cowan
Sceptre

Common Ground

Andrew Cowan
Authors:
Andrew Cowan

Ashley, a disaffected geography teacher and Jay, a printer in a local arts project, are about to start a family, though both have mixed feelings about becoming parents, especially when their house is crumbling around them and their neighbourhood seems increasingly anarchic. As Jay becomes deeply involved in the fight to save the ancient woodland of Hogslea Common from a planned motorway, Ashley corresponds with his carefree brother, who is backpacking round the world. With the gap between the couple widening as steadily as the cracks in their walls, Ashley has to choose between his parents' values and abandoning a society he finds increasingly precarious and menacing. By the author of the award-winning PIG, this is a sharply observed, often funny and thought-provoking tale of modern life and of the choices we all have to make - as parents, children and members of society. Â

Sceptre

What I Know

Andrew Cowan
Authors:
Andrew Cowan